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Lukuzz
post Aug 3 2015, 05:33 PM
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So I have a 'Competency Interview' coming up for a role as a Perosnal Banker, I've been told to research the questioning technique and answers and to give STAR examples for the questions (Situation, Tasks, Action & Results)

Has anyone else had an interview like this? What can I expect and what type of specific questions do you think they will ask for this role?

Any advice whatsoever would be amazing. I'm nervous and I NEED a new job!

Time to get my brain in gear wink.gif
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Rooney
post Aug 3 2015, 05:39 PM
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Most interviews are always like this. It's so hard to say what they're looking for because each company has a different competency framework.

Usually the questions are like 'give an example of how you exceeded customers expectations' 'describe a moment when you have persuaded another team member to follow your view' 'give an example of leadership'.

There's loads of good stuff on Google I'm sure - best of luck!
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Lukuzz
post Aug 3 2015, 06:43 PM
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Thankyou smile.gif yeah I just need to get lots of examples from my current jobs and not freeze and get too nervous !
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Suedehead2
post Aug 3 2015, 07:52 PM
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Yes, this type of interview is very common. Remember that your examples don't all need to be work-related, as long as you demonstrate the competency required.

If there is a job description for the role (either from something they have sent you, or their website), look at that for some idea of what competencies they will be looking for. Rooney's examples are all good ones. At least one of them is highly likely to be asked.

When looking on Google, it is best to look at reputable recruitment agency sites such as this.

Good luck.
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Rooney
post Aug 3 2015, 08:14 PM
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Yeah the best way to prepare for them is to list everything you've done academically, professionally and in leisure e.g. sports clubs, societies, hobbies. It's hard to predict the questions, but if you already know what you have done then you can just adapt to the questions.

Trick is to make sure you're not using the same examples for all the questions i.e. if you worked in a shop, don't use 6 examples of working in a shop. The more varieties the better. Generally there's questions on leadership, thinking proactively, customer orientation, working in a team, problem solving. But of course it depends what sort of role you're going for.
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Lukuzz
post Aug 3 2015, 08:37 PM
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Thanks both of you, both very helpful!
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Cal
post Aug 3 2015, 08:56 PM
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I've had one of these types of interviews and they're not as bad as they sound. Like Rooney and Suede have said, examples are extremely important. The questions I had tended to be quite open ("How would you motivate your team to reach your daily, weekly, and monthly targets?") which made it a lot easier to state my case and give examples relating to the usual STAR areas. Mine was about 35 - 40 minutes but the key is to answer the questions they're asking, give plenty of relevant and detailed examples, and try not to waffle about stuff that's not relevant. I was also given a KPI spreadsheet detailing a store's performance that I had to evaluate and then they wanted my feedback in relation to what the problem areas were and how I would address them, but I'm not sure if that's common in these interviews.

Best of luck! biggrin.gif
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(Zach)
post Aug 4 2015, 10:58 PM
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I've worked for a credit union for over six years and I currently supervise our loan department. I've worked at a branch and in our call center as well. I regularly sit in on interviews so a few things that I typically look for:

-Like everyone else said, examples. But one thing I can't emphasize enough is SPECIFIC examples. So not "I really like to help people" or "I'm really good at figuring out what people need" but "One time I had a friend who..." or "One time I came across a situation where..." General statements are great but only if you back them up with very specific examples.

-There are two things that every financial institution cares about: 1) Keeping their customers happy and 2) Generating revenue or reducing expenses. If you can convince them that you'll help in those areas you are set. You can do this by letting them know you really like people and you look forward to having conversations with customers so that you can figure out what they need and offer the products or services that will best fit their needs. You could also say that you seek out ways to work more efficiently and like to find better ways of doing things.

-If you haven't already, find out what you can about the company's culture and goals. Often times you can find at least a mission statement or something on their website that will give you an idea about who they are. Then use that information to your advantage.

-Be careful not to make too bold of statements. Be mindful of what message certain statements might send. For example, don't say something like "I'm a perfectionist" because they might read that as you being impatient or "I'm extremely patient" as they might view you as a pushover. You want to find that balance between being subtle and assertive.

-Be yourself and be calm! And don't feel like you have to be extra proper. We can usually see through that stuff and then the interview ends up being uncomfortable for everyone involved. Be respectful but don't be afraid to show your personality smile.gif

-Prove that you are open-minded, flexible, and self-sufficient.

I could probably go on all day but hopefully that gets you started. Best of luck and let us know how it goes!
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Calum
post Aug 5 2015, 12:43 AM
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What bank are you applying for, may I ask? ohmy.gif
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5 Silas Frøkner
post Aug 5 2015, 02:59 PM
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Don't be afraid to take a second to consider the question before you answer it. Nothing worse than starting an answer when you don't know where it's going or when you get half way through it and realise it has nothing to do with the question.

STAR is a great jumping off point. If you can link the A and the R then you're on to a winner. It's great to show how your actions caused a positive result. STAR is a letter too short though, if you've done something brilliant, e.g. given great customer service, then it can be great to back up your STAR story with an F (Feedback). So, using one of my go to answers for example:

A customer approached me looking for some help choosing some plants to decorate the reception at her daughters wedding, they hadn't anticipated the room would look quite so empty once all the table settings were in. I spoke to the customer to understand the colour theme of the wedding, what type of plant she was looking for and where it would be featured in the room. After getting this information I was able to direct the customer to our lollypop bay trees, that were on offer that week, as they suited the customers requirements. She purchased 4. The next week the customer returned, I enquired how things had gone and she said that the trees were perfect. She thanked me for my assistance and said that since that day she'd been recommending our store to everyone.

The last two sentences are really good to reinforce that the actions you took, and their results, were positive and a success.
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Suedehead2
post Aug 5 2015, 08:02 PM
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The advice about a short pause to think of your answer is a good one. To you, the pause might seem very long. In reality, it will probably only be a few seconds and the interviewers will accept that.
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