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> Favourite Novel of the 19th Century, Nominations
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Taylor Jago
post Aug 31 2016, 11:06 AM
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Everyone loves a good book. Right? Whether by pressing a button on a Kindle, by going to school/college/university, or by scrolling through the perfect alphabetically ordered 300 page paperbacks in a store or library, we all read.

Reading is a great experience, particularly when you do it of your own free will and not because of a forthcoming exam. There are millions of literary works to enjoy, whether they be comics, young adult books, or classics.

During the 19th century (which is considered here to be from January 1, 1800 to December 31, 1899) hundreds of novels were written by hundreds of novelists. Your job, for the time being, is to nominate your favourites.

You can nominate as few or as many as you like, as long as they qualify as a novel (so works such as "The Final Problem" by Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle, "The Horla" by Guy de Maupassant or "The Three Strangers" by Thomas Hardy do not count as those are short stories) and in the time period (so don't go nominating the Harry Potter series, Homer's Odyssey or Romeo and Juliet, because I will ignore it).

If this competition is popular enough, a 20th Century edition may follow.

Get nominating!
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Cherry.
post Aug 31 2016, 11:15 AM
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i love the idea of this!!!!!
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Brett-Butler
post Aug 31 2016, 12:20 PM
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Unsurprisingly (or surprisingly, depending your perception of me), I have not read many novels from the 19th Century. However, of the ones I have read, I will say that these ones were jolly good indeed -

Frankenstein - Mary Shelly
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Flatland - Edwin A. Abbot.
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bipolar angel
post Aug 31 2016, 12:23 PM
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oliver twist!

i wanted a charles dickens one, and eventually between christmas carol and oliver, went for oliver. such a good book.

Swiss Family Robinson

Jane Eyre (love that book)

think that's it

the other 2 i wanted i can't have because they are pubblished earlier/ later

really wanted murder on the orient express and gulliver's travels

oh well. you really can't control when a book is pubblished. lol
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Taylor Jago
post Oct 1 2016, 07:20 AM
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The deadline for nominations is currently November 12th, 2016, so you have 6 more weeks to nominate.
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MoistSummerFruit
post Oct 1 2016, 02:49 PM
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Can I DE-nominate works? Not a hue fan or 19th century books in general but Frankenstein is one of the WORST I have ever read on a ńar with earlier 'classic' Moll Flanders for bein ohmy.gif
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MoistSummerFruit
post Oct 1 2016, 02:50 PM
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Frankenstein is not 'jolly good' - it is unjoyously terrible.
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Flatcap
post Oct 1 2016, 02:59 PM
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Didn't see this topic earlier, think I was in the midst of a four day shift at work. Most of the books on my reading list are from this era.

Barnaby Rudge: - A Tale of the Riots of Eighty Charles Dickens

A Laodicean Thomas Hardy

Jude the Obscure Thomas Hardy

Wives and Daughters Elizabeth Gaskell

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Anne Bronte
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MoistSummerFruit
post Oct 1 2016, 04:19 PM
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I'm gonna have to review the dates/ period to compile me liwt and de-nominate the two I mentionrf above for being :puke2;
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Suedehead2
post Oct 1 2016, 06:15 PM
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QUOTE(Brett-Butler @ Aug 31 2016, 01:20 PM) *
Unsurprisingly (or surprisingly, depending your perception of me), I have not read many novels from the 19th Century. However, of the ones I have read, I will say that these ones were jolly good indeed -

Frankenstein - Mary Shelly
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Flatland - Edwin A. Abbot.

Another fan of Flatland ohmy.gif It's good just to find somebody else who has heard of it. It was recommended to me by a lecturer at university, but it took many years for me to find a copy.
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RosaParksMyCar
post Oct 1 2016, 06:20 PM
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i stan for mary shelley ever since i found out she carried her dead husbands HEART in her purse.
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RosaParksMyCar
post Oct 1 2016, 06:20 PM
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queen
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Chez Wombat
post Oct 1 2016, 07:35 PM
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Wuthering Heights (Emily Bronte)
Jane Eyre (Charlotte Bronte)
Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
Dracula (Bram Stoker)
A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)
Dr Jekyll & My Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson)
The Time Machine (HG Wells)

I would nominate more but my knowledge of this century's novels is quite low after finishing A Level English Lit :'( (I'm teaching GCSE English this year tho so maybe I'll get back to you kink.gif)
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Brett-Butler
post Oct 1 2016, 08:25 PM
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QUOTE(Suedehead2 @ Oct 1 2016, 07:15 PM) *
Another fan of Flatland ohmy.gif It's good just to find somebody else who has heard of it. It was recommended to me by a lecturer at university, but it took many years for me to find a copy.


I'd first heard about the book in my teens when I read The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde (the 3rd book in the Thursday Next series, which is a great and offbeat series which references lots of other books), in which Flatland is an important plot device (it's called the 'last original story'). I ended up reading it a few years later when I downloaded an iPod app which had 20 classic novels on it, Flatland included, and absolutely adored it.
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Suedehead2
post Oct 2 2016, 08:53 AM
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QUOTE(Brett-Butler @ Oct 1 2016, 09:25 PM) *
I'd first heard about the book in my teens when I read The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde (the 3rd book in the Thursday Next series, which is a great and offbeat series which references lots of other books), in which Flatland is an important plot device (it's called the 'last original story'). I ended up reading it a few years later when I downloaded an iPod app which had 20 classic novels on it, Flatland included, and absolutely adored it.

There was a "sequel" published in 2001. I didn't think it was as good as the original novel and, of course, it fails to qualify for this by just over 100 years.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Flatterland-Like-F...k/dp/073820675X
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popchartfreak
post Oct 4 2016, 07:07 PM
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The Coral Island (Ballantyne)
Martin Chuzzelwit (Dickens)
Time Machine (wells)
Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
War Of The Worlds (Wells)

never got hold of Flatland but have heard about it all my sci-fi-fan life.
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Taylor Jago
post Nov 8 2016, 05:29 PM
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Emily Brontė - Wuthering Heights
Charles Dickens - Oliver Twist
Victor Hugo - The Last Day of a Condemned Man
Guy de Maupassant - Une vie
Jules Verne - Around The World In 80 Days
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jonny
post Nov 29 2016, 09:06 PM
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Although most of my reading is 20th century+, these are my two favourite novels published in the 19th:

Jane Austen Emma
The first Austen novel I read and I was entranced by the language and the description. In hindsight it can get a little tedious at times but when I first read it I was engrossed.

Thomas Hardy Tess of the d'Urbervilles
One of my favourite stories full stop. When I first read the book I felt that I could relate so much to the relationship between Tess and Angel. It is a slow build but the way that Hardy challenges and criticises the sexual norms of the time is really excellent. The passage where Tess tells Angel of her encounter with Alec was one of those moments where you want to just rip the pages out. I couldn't take it.
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Jester
post Nov 29 2016, 09:13 PM
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Conan Doyle - The Hound of the Baskervilles
Bram Stoker - Dracula
Mary Shelley - Frankenstein
Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol
H G Wells - War Of The Worlds
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Jester
post Nov 29 2016, 09:14 PM
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QUOTE(Brett-Butler @ Oct 1 2016, 08:25 PM) *
I'd first heard about the book in my teens when I read The Well of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde (the 3rd book in the Thursday Next series, which is a great and offbeat series which references lots of other books), in which Flatland is an important plot device (it's called the 'last original story'). I ended up reading it a few years later when I downloaded an iPod app which had 20 classic novels on it, Flatland included, and absolutely adored it.

I love the Thursday Next books! Was sure I was alone with this.
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