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Severin
post Apr 2 2017, 06:57 PM
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Since I recently did my countdown of 2016 Horror movies and a few people commented that they liked the fact that there were a fair few films they'd not heard of but found interesting. So, I thought since I'd enjoyed doing it so much, and since I watch a lot of Horrors and since there might be interest I would post the occasional review of largely new films as and when I watch them.


So up first is Pet

Pet




Directed by Carles Torrens

Following a chance meeting, Animal Shelter worker Seth becomes increasingly obsessed over former high school crush Holly. Before long he has trapped her in a cage deep beneath the animal shelter.

Pet holds the distinction of being 2016's lowest grossing film with a total takings over $70 from its single cinema screening. Reviews at the time came out mostly negative, usually citing the increasing implausibilities of the plot, and whilst there's some definite truth to that there's still much to enjoy about this low budget production.
The cast is small and much of the film focuses only on the two leads - Dominic Monaghan (Lost, The Lord Of The Rings) and Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl). Both play out their roles with conviction even if the script is occasionally sub-par. The film could conceivably work as a play giving a skilled director and a bit of a re-write.
What does let the film down however is the implausibility of the final third but if you can suspend your disbelief for an hour and a half this is kind of fun.


6/10
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Severin
post Apr 10 2017, 07:28 PM
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Clown




Directed by Jon Watts

When a devoted husband and father discovers the clown he hired for his son's birthday party has to cancel he decides to fill in himself. Unfortunately the costume he uses is not your every day clown suit

Clown began life as a fake trailer that boldly quoted Eli Roth as producer despite him having no involvement, but it was this very attitude that inspired him to get involved in a film that takes its ridiculous premise (man slowly turns into murderous 'clownbeast') and does something surprisingly different with it. Director Jon Watts (Spiderman: Homecoming) shys away from splatter movie territory and instead creates a film that appears to be an allegory for one man's struggle with his own paedophilia - our former devout family man seems to prey exclusively on young boys. The film is therefore clearly influenced by the real life story of John Wayne Gacy - the serial killer whose regular charity work involved his Pogo The Clown character. It's other obvious influence is David Cronenberg's The Fly. Like Jeff Goldblum's character in that film, our main character slowly transforms into something else over the course of the film.

Clown is an odd film, it starts of comically and you think it's going to turn into a boring slasher film and whilst it is far from perfect there are a few moments in it that are genuinely interesting and an unpleasant subtext that elevates it above drivel into something of a curio.


5/10


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Severin
post Apr 12 2017, 05:47 PM
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Wyrmwood: Road Of The Dead




Directed by Kiah Roache-Turner

Barry is a talented mechanic and family man whose life is torn apart on the eve of a zombie apocalypse. His sister, Brooke, is kidnapped by a sinister team of gas-mask wearing soldiers & experimented on by a psychotic doctor. While Brooke plans her escape Barry goes out on the road to find her

Wyrmwood, to use it's original title, is great fun and looks fabulous. Admittedly there are some issues regarding a lack of plot but like all road movies, it is the journey that matters and there is plenty to enjoy here. Whilst road movies and zombie films are among the most cliche ridden genres these days, Wyrmwood manages to threw in plenty of fresh ideas and the ones that is does borrow are largely from unexpected sources. The ability to form a psychic connection with the dead is a notably novel idea. This, as well as the Australian setting, makes for a zombie flick that feels very different to the crowd, and although it's not on a par with Busanhaeng, it is much better than most recently.
It should be noted hat Wyrmwood isn't meant to be scary. It knows it shouldn't be taken seriously but doesn't stray into outright slapstick like, say Bad Taste (a film that clearly helped influence this).
A sequel has been commissioned apparently and Roache-Turner could well be up for big things one day



7/10
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Severin
post Apr 19 2017, 01:20 PM
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Southbound




Directed by Radio Silence, Roxanne Benjamin, David Bruckner, and Patrick Horvath.

Five interlocking tales of terror follow the fates of a group of weary travellers who confront their worst nightmares and darkest secrets on a desolate stretch of desert highway.

Remember those old anthology films they used to make? Films like Dead Of Night, Creepshow or The Twilight Zone: The Movie. Well, this is one of them, and it's a corker. Made in 2015 and released last year, it's one of those I'd heard about because it made a number of best Horrors of 2016 lists and having finally gotten round to seeing it, I can definitely agree.
There are five separate stories all connected over a lonely piece of road somewhere in the US desert. Each story has around 15-20 minutes to play out but each one segues nicely into the next having given us enough information to know that there's a much bigger tale under the surface but we are only seeing a glimpse into a fraction of it. Consequently, it leaves you guessing in places but importantly it leaves you wanting to see more. Crucially every story is connected in a clever and wonderfully executed over-riding arc. Despite the numerous directors there is a fluid feel and no major tonal shifts or jarring switches. The acting is mostly good although the shakiest parts is in the first segment but it's thankfully fairly brief and things settle down quickly. The film doesn't go for out and out tension or scares but is a great collection of campfire stories all tied up with a very smart resolution.
Unfortunately because the stories are brief, any description more detailed than the above contains spoilers. Suffice to say I thoroughly recommend this.



7.5/10


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Severin
post Apr 22 2017, 01:49 PM
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The Devil's Candy




Directed by Sean Byrne.

When struggling artist Jesse and his family purchase a spacious Texan ranch at a bargain price they are very much aware of the tragedy that befell the former owners. Jesse soon begins creating work as though something intangible was controlling him. And then the previous occupants son unexpectedly returns home.

Released in March 2017 The Devil's Candy caused something of a buzz at the Toronto International Film Festival 2 years ago and is the 2nd film from The Loved Ones' director Sean Byrne who is fast making something of a name for himself.
I was a little dubious when this began. The trailer was great but the opening 10 minutes of the film had me concerned that this was going to be hugely disappointing. Fortunately I continued with it and was rewarded with a smart movie that played with recognised tropes and had a genuine understanding of what makes a Horror movie work. What could be a generic Amityville Horror rip off switches things up by having the previous victims murderer be alive and present during the events. It also throws conventional finale expectations out of the window too, all the while serving us up a film that feels realistically grimy and unpleasant. There's no huge amount of gore or violence but it is there and presented in a matter of fact way that serves to make it more uncomfortable than typical Hollywood fare.
The main antagonist is played by the ever creepy Pruitt Taylor Vince whose real life eye condition is neither played up or played down but is present enough to be noticeable and only adds to the air of unease around his character.
The film takes it's time, slowly increasing the danger and tension before literally ending in a blaze of violence, fear and fire.

Something for those who like a gritty, grimy Horror



7.5/10


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Severin
post Apr 23 2017, 07:58 PM
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The Blackcoat's Daughter (aka February)




Directed by Oz Perkins.

Two girls must battle a mysterious evil force when they get left behind at their boarding school over winter break..

Wow! I loved this film. I didn't expect to and I'd been putting it off for a while but this is great. Having said that it isn't for every one - it reminded me of The Witch in a number of ways and I know that film has its detractors.
The IMDB description I've used above doesn't really help sell it either to be honest but two girls do indeed get left at school over the winter break.
Right from the start the film sets out its atmospheric and unsettling tone with a striking dream sequence. From there on in it gently builds on that with each scene taking its time and lingering just long enough to make it feel uncomfortable. Kiernan Shipka of Mad Men fame (who at points looks worryingly like my ex) plays Katherine who initially comes across as timid compared to the more outgoing Rose. Rose has engineered her parents late arrival in order to meet up with a boy she's been seeing, whilst Katherine believes her earlier dream may be something more. Katherine always appears distant and distracted, moving in to a more and more absent state of mind as the film continues and Rose soon finds herself increasingly frightened of her.
Meanwhile the mysterious Joan (played by Emma Roberts) has arrived in town and befriended a couple who offer to help her travel home.
The two stories dovetail nicely and the film does jump around in a non-linear fashion occasionally and I can't tell if that signposted the ending too much or if that improved the anticipation. Either way it didn't detract from the ending for me.
What I loved most about the film is that it approached its subject from a totally fresh angle. It does away with your typical girls in peril devices and focuses on what happens after the demon has been exorcised. What if it wasn't horrific for the possessed? What if the voices in your head were a comfort? What if you missed them? In doing so it makes the ending a weirdly conflicting experience.

After Personal Shopper (which I can't bring myself to categorize as a Horror) this is my favourite film of this year so far. Yeah, I'm giving it a big old 9/10



9/10


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Severin
post May 2 2017, 11:00 PM
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Here Alone




Year - 2017
Directed by Rod Blackhurst.


A young woman struggles to survive on her own in the wake of a mysterious epidemic that has killed much of society, and forced her deep into the unforgiving wilderness.

As a virus turns the world's population into (you've guessed it) zombies a married couple flee with their new born baby out into the remote countryside where the father grew up. One year later only the mother remains, alone but surviving in the wilderness. Then one day she stumbles across a man and young girl in trouble and must decide whether or not to help.
No prizes for originality in storytelling, think The Walking Dead meets Z For Zacariah - of which it is tonally very similar. However, it does have a great performance from it's lead actress Lucy Walters and an elegaic beauty in its directing and pace that means the good outweighs the bad. The film revels in the boredom and stillness of everyday survival as our main protagonist wisely chooses to avoid confrontation if possible.
Made on a tiny budget, the film avoids the exaggerated cliches of zombie films (and no tedious jump scares) and, with an admirably natural script, focuses in on its characters - to the point where some may find it dull or uneventful and it is true that not much actually happens over the course of 90 minutes but I found myself drawn in by the characterisation and genuinely happy to simply watch along as events slowly (yet somewhat predicatably) unfolded. The film doesn't quite managed to make the final act resonate as well as it would like to and that's another weak point.
This isn't necessarily a film I would crave to see once more, but would nevertheless happily watch again because there is much to admire about it. However, despite a great script, directing and impressive lead the lack of a satisfying conclusion and originality lowers the score.



6.5/10


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Severin
post May 6 2017, 07:53 PM
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The Taking Of Deborah Logan




Year - 2014
Directed by Adam Robitel.


An elderly woman battling Alzheimer's disease agrees to let a film crew document her condition, but what they discover is something far more sinister going on..

The Taking, as it was originally called is a mockumentary Horror film that tells the story of Deborah Logan, a woman suffering the early stages of Alzheimers who allows herself to be the subject of a medical student's video project in exchange for financial help. Being a Horror film there's obviously more going on in the end but the first hour of the film presents itself as a study of the disease... and it's genuinely unsettling. Jill Larson, who plays the titular Deborah turns in a simply brilliant and nuanced performance that is equal parts frightening, sympathetic and tragic. It's an incredibly bold performance that requires a fair share of undignified moments as well as scenes that quietly demonstrate the heartbreaking nature of the disease.
Robitel's direction never intrudes too much on the performances leaves enough of an anticipation that something awful is about to happen. The supporting cast especially the daughter Sarah give strong performances and despite a few logic inconsistencies the story hangs together well. The final half an hour does descend into overly familiar territory but it does have a unique take on its subject that is refreshing even if the finale itself doesn't have any new ideas - except one. One which has become quite well known as a meme. The moment in question is particularly striking and doesn't the recognition it has acquired

The Taking is a film in which its truest Horror lies in its least fantastical aspects but there's enough chills and a wonderful creepiness to the rest of it that means it's still a fun, late night watch with some great acting and a director to put on the watchlist



6.5/10
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Severin
post May 21 2017, 04:03 PM
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House On Willow Street




Year - 2016
Directed by Alistair Orr.


After a young woman is kidnapped, her captors soon come to realize that in fact they may be the ones in danger and this young woman has a dark secret inside her.

This South African film got its US released back in March and the trailer suggested that there may be something interesting happening with the story - the kidnappers become the prey to their victim or... some thing. Sadly the execution is sorely lacking. Sharni Vinson (You're Next) stars as the default leader of a gang of kidnappers whose cliche heavy 'one last job' has been six weeks in the planning. The teenage daughter of a local jewelry dealer is the target and whilst the plan succeeds they come across as ill prepared, incompetent scumbags. I'm unsure as to whether this was intentional but even with no experience and six weeks of planning I could pull off a more efficient kidnapping than this. When the parents don't respond to their ransom calls they return to the scene to investigate (the word trap is barely mentioned) only to discover that all is not normal in the house.
After that things go clumsily downhill as the gang become the hunted and aside from an ill thought out supernatural element you're basically watching a film that takes everything that was good about Don't Breathe and The Purge films, writes that out and then plods along from one cliche to the next with an ever increasing sense of boredom.

A shame as this could have been decent. To be fair it looks quite nice and Sharni Vinson plays her part spiritedly (even the unexplained character shifts) but it's just done with so little flair or invention that all it's flaws become more pronounced until that's all there is to see.




3/10
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Severin
post May 29 2017, 04:03 PM
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Prevenge




Year - 2016
Directed by Alice Lowe.


Widow Ruth is seven months pregnant when, believing herself to be guided by her unborn baby, she embarks on a homicidal rampage, dispatching anyone who stands in her way.

This British film was released back in February and gained quite a positive buzz for its decidedly black humour and interesting premise, including winning an award for monster innovation. Although writer, director and star Alice Lowe has had roles in films such as Hot Fuzz and World's End she is probably best recognised from her numerous UK TV appearances - including Horrible Histories, The IT Crowd, Skins, Sherlock, Garth Merenghi's Dark Place, Little Britain, The Mighty Boosh and many more. What she has produced here is a very British take on the slasher flick.

Personally, I can see its merits and whilst I'm normally a fan of black humour, I just didn't find this particularly amusing. The problem though is if te umour isn't working there's not much else to go on. It's not suspensful or tense, and whilst it does have something to say about guilt and grief it isn't particularly profound. Alice Lowe, who was actually pregnant during filming gives a strong and nuanced performance but beyond that there's nothing more than vague allusions to character and some poor acting exposed by a thin script.

I can see some people loving this. I understand why and I'm glad it exists but it rather left me cold.




5/10
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Severin
post May 29 2017, 04:34 PM
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Raw




Year - 2016
Directed by Julia Ducornau.


When a young vegetarian undergoes a carnivorous hazing ritual at vet school, an unbidden taste for meat begins to grow in her.

Raw, of all the Horror films due out in 2017, was the one that had the most hype and had me most excited.

It doesn't disappoint. Raw is an incredible film. It is a Horror but it's as much a Greek tragedy and a coming of age film as well, and it is immensely layered and very smart.
In many ways it reminds me of Let The Right One In although it has nothing to do with vampires, but it has that smartness and tone throughout.

I don't want to give too much away as the experience will be all the better for it and the description in bold above says just the right amount. Central character Justine (superbly played by Garance Marillier), following her initiation finds herself on a path of self discovery, (mis)guided by her older sister. The film is hypnotic and often has a dreamlike quality, all the while embracing themes of alienation, desire, and self awakening as Justine realises feelings and desires she never new existed as she tries to fit in to a new and confusing form of young adulthood.

I really can't say too much more but this French/Belgian production is haunting, thoughtful and provocative. It came with a reputation of audiences finding it too much to stomach and even tales of people fainting during screenings. This may or may not be true but whilst the film does have some striking imagery and some elements that many will find unsettling the reputation does the film a diservice. It is not a gross out gore fest and it isn't that unflinching. It shows just enough of what it wants to and allows the mind to carry the rest.

I'm struggling to decide if this or the excellent Personal Shopper is my film of the year so far.


10/10
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Severin
post Jun 1 2017, 07:32 PM
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The Rift




Year - 2016
Directed by Dejan Zecevic.


An American military satellite crash lands in Eastern Serbia and a team of US and Serbian agents are dispatched to secure the remains of the satellite, but when they locate the crash site all is not as it seems.

The Rift is a film I ended up watching by accident. I couldn't remember the title of the film I wanted (The Void) and clicked on this thinking it might've been the one. This has been sat around waiting for me to watch it for a while now (as has The Void) and so I finally decided to take the plunge. Was it as terrible as I feared or a hidden gem?

Well, kind of both... It suffers from the holy trinity of problems - acting, script and directing. None of which are terrible but all are below par and together they can floor a decent idea. And The Rift is a decent idea. Not an original one but if thought of as a pilot for a possible TV show in the vein of The X-files meets Doctor Who it actually works quite well in the end. The set up is largely dull and the middle section a little slow and bogged down by being both too wordy (poor script) and not exciting (bad action sequences/no tension) but the film sort of comes alive in the final third wherein it ditches the sci-fi worm whole business and shifts its tone to something markedly different with enough threads open to continue and a cliffhanger that makes you want to see what happens next week.

It's not great, and as I said it feels and looks like a TV pilot in many ways but if you can get though the first 40 minutes or so you might find yourself mildly entertained


5.5/10
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Severin
post Jun 4 2017, 03:18 PM
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Hounds Of Love




Year - 2016
Directed by Ben Young.


A cold-blooded predatory couple while cruising the streets in search of their next victim, will stumble upon a 17-year-old high school girl, who will be sedated, abducted and chained in the strangers' guest room.

Horror films are designed (like all films should be) to provoke the viewer into an emotional response. Usually that might be fear or excitement, sometimes laughter. But for me the very best ones do two things. They make you feel really uncomfortable but crucially they make you think.
Hounds Of Love does both. It reminds you how easily an innocent mistake can have terrifying consequences and how little we know about the people around us.
And boy, does it make for unsettling viewing. It's never gratuitous or unnecessarily lingering but it has an overarching sense of dread and a slow deliberate pace that heightens your acknowledgement that the actions you are watching are horrendous. And they're probably happening to someone somewhere right now.
The film does have other roles but what we essentially witness is the relationship between the couple and their victim and all three cast members turn in mesmerizing performances, the least of which is Stephen Curry's psychotic murderer. For it is the two female leads that steal the show. Emma Booth's wonderful portrayal of twisted, insane devotion mixed with vulnerability is both horrifying and yet at times you feel for her too. These two are reminiscent of Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis in Natural Born Killers, but this time it's not played out cartoonishly or with MTV generation post-modernism. This is played slow, deliberate and with depth.
Yet it is Ashleigh Cummings who stands as the best. She has rightly won awards for a performance that is mostly conveyed through her eyes in an impressive display of physical acting that is only punctuated occasionally with screams, whimpers or dialogue. And when she does use her voice the effect is all the more powerful for it.

The film also ends with one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever created - Joy Division's Atmosphere

Not a film for everyone and not quite perfect but a hidden gem for those who want something simple but powerful and beautifully crafted and acted




8/10
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Severin
post Jun 7 2017, 11:47 AM
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I Am Not A Serial Killer




Year - 2016
Directed by Billy O'Brien.


In a small Midwestern town, a troubled teen with homicidal tendencies must hunt down and destroy a supernatural killer whilst keeping his own inner demons at bay.

I Am Not A Serial Killer is a rather unusual film. Part teen melodrama part Coen Brothers thriller, part Horror and part Sci-Fi (sort of). And yet it works so well. It shifts genre's effortlessly and with a fluidity that never feels forced. it always stays true to itself and never over emphasizes its influences.

Max Records plays John Wayne Cleaver, diagnosed as a sociopath and obsessed with serial killers, he lives his life by a set of rules designed to prevent him from succumbing to his darker urges. Whilst John struggles to stay on an even keel, an actual serial killer has become active in the town and he realizes that he has a greater understanding of the killer than the local authorities. It is his curiosity that leads him to try to uncover the killer's identity but even he is not prepared for what he will find. Meanwhile we can never be sure if the killer is John himself and this is all playing out in his mind.
Max's performance is outstanding, as is the support from Back to The Future's Christopher Lloyd, who plays an elderly and infirm but wise neighbor who quotes Blake poetry and ruminates on the futility of life whilst doting on his wife. Lloyd has always been a fine actor but here he delivers a richly layered character that carries the weight of years on his back.

The setting and black humour is reminiscent of Fargo and all the characters are given enough screen time to develop some complexity to them.
The final third of the film, written down, would look absurd in many ways but it is so masterfully crafted that it never takes you out of the movie and it just works because everyone involved believes in the film and the script, directing and acting all hits exactly the right note.
This is a film that deserves multiple viewings




8/10


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Severin
post Jun 13 2017, 06:58 PM
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Devil In The Dark




Year - 2017
Directed by Tim Brown.


Two estranged brothers find themselves stalked by a terrifying unknown presence while on a weekend hunting trip in remote British Columbia..

Devil In The Dark came out back in March of this year and is a low budget Canadian film with a small castand it's surprisingly well put together.
Starting out more like a Drama the first half of the film focuses on the relationship between the two brothers. Flashbacks provide half the backstory whilst a dialogue heavy series of scenes round it off and add depth. Aside from a pair of creepy dream sequences the film has no Horror elements until fairly late on, by which point both characters are nicely fleshed out.
Once they reach their destination things take an altogether darker tone and the strangeness that had been merely background hints begins to assert itself and come to the fore.
The sound and music are both excellent, the acting is naturalistic in unspectacular, the cinematography is decent and the script is mostly solid but it would be generous to suggest there's much in the way of plot. Indeed the drama element is more considered and effective than the final act. Although, despite a fair few cliches and secondhand ideas the film plays to it's strengths by not revealing too much too soon and always keeping its monster 'in the dark' so to speak, even if the final resolution is a bit wtf?

All in all a flawed yet pleasantly diverting flick with some great elements that is perfectly ok way to spend 80 minutes.






6/10
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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd June 2017 - 06:22 PM