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> Yesteryear's Artists, Can they make any chart impact?
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post Jun 15 2017, 09:03 AM
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So like me, you may have noticed a rather high number of what were once high profile names in the music business making some kind of resurgence. Artists are returning, some after a 10 year+ absence with the hope of trying to reach a new audience with their music.

The question is, does it work? mellow.gif

Consider the following names who have made or are making some kind of comeback in the last year or so;

All Saints
The Corrs
Craig David
Geri Halliwell
Liam Gallagher
Martine McCutcheon
Shania Twain
Steps


Is it a worthy endeavour for artists who are in their 30's or 40's to try and reinvent themselves to appeal to a younger generation of listeners who may not have known them at their peak? huh.gif

Discuss.
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danG
post Jun 15 2017, 09:05 AM
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If they're dance or urban acts, yes. Craig David proved it.

Pop acts of that age usually go for the Radio 2 market as they know the younger generation just aren't interested.
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ML Hammer95
post Jun 15 2017, 09:10 AM
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Sean Paul surely?

Artists like Eminem, Busta Rhymes and Nelly have had big comeback hits years after their peak too.
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post Jun 15 2017, 09:14 AM
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QUOTE(danG @ Jun 15 2017, 10:05 AM) *
Pop acts of that age usually go for the Radio 2 market as they know the younger generation just aren't interested.

True, but then wouldn't that surely feel like a bittersweet failing? *Lisa Scott-Lee teas*

Surely these artists want to have hits again to validate their work. They want people to listen to their music and buy it, then to see them perform those songs live in concert.

So again I ask, is it really worth going to all that effort to make a comeback only to see your single/album flop? unsure.gif
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danG
post Jun 15 2017, 09:18 AM
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Well Steps' album didn't flop, having a hit single isn't entirely necessary for a hit album.
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burbe
post Jun 15 2017, 09:22 AM
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QUOTE(ML Hammer95 @ Jun 15 2017, 10:10 AM) *
Sean Paul surely?

Artists like Eminem, Busta Rhymes and Nelly have had big comeback hits years after their peak too.


Sean Paul was never not irrelevant tho, imo. He's had hits consistently since his breakthrough.
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Dexton
post Jun 15 2017, 09:24 AM
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QUOTE(ML Hammer95 @ Jun 15 2017, 05:10 PM) *
Sean Paul surely?


I'm not sure abut Sean Paul tbh, he's had consistent medium-size chart hits for years now without much of a break. Granted a few of them (especially in recent years) have been features but he's still been prominent. He hasn't really had to reinvent himself either.

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post Jun 15 2017, 10:04 AM
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QUOTE(burbe @ Jun 15 2017, 10:22 AM) *
Sean Paul was never not irrelevant tho, imo. He's had hits consistently since his breakthrough.


Was that an intentional double-negative?
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post Jun 15 2017, 10:06 AM
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QUOTE(danG @ Jun 15 2017, 10:05 AM) *
If they're dance or urban acts, yes. Craig David proved it.

Pop acts of that age usually go for the Radio 2 market as they know the younger generation just aren't interested.


Why would the younger generation be interested in over-the-hill urban & dance acts, but not those of other genres?
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danG
post Jun 15 2017, 10:14 AM
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older urban acts (Kanye, Eminem, Jay Z) can still reinvent themselves at this stage of their career. it's harder for pop acts to do the same.
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Tawdry Hepburn
post Jun 15 2017, 10:25 AM
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A big part of it is due to radio refusing to playlist artists after a certain point, rather than specifically people "not being interested".
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mdh
post Jun 15 2017, 12:19 PM
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And it does seem as though Spotify is a lot less likely to support older acts. There is still a place in the market for many artists that've made comebacks after a long time - but not in the singles chart.
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Shaphne
post Jun 15 2017, 12:43 PM
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QUOTE(awardinary @ Jun 15 2017, 10:14 AM) *
True, but then wouldn't that surely feel like a bittersweet failing? *Lisa Scott-Lee teas*

Surely these artists want to have hits again to validate their work. They want people to listen to their music and buy it, then to see them perform those songs live in concert.

So again I ask, is it really worth going to all that effort to make a comeback only to see your single/album flop? unsure.gif

Why should they just give up just because younger people don't like it or it doesn't sell Adele levels? :/ A large amount of those acts will have a dedicated fanbase who have followed them for year and will still buy their music. They wont sell the same amount but who really cares? There's more to making music than just getting hits.

Steps have proven that even without massive hit singles and hugely selling albums that you can still sell out venues for concerts. And if people ar enjoying the music then that's the important thing.

Shania has said in interviews how important her music is and how it helped her get through really dark times in her life. I'm not expecitng her to sell as she did 15-20 years ago by any means but I can't wait for her album. She's worked hard on it and I doubt she'd give a flying f*** if it "flops" if she manages to make music that people connect to and that might help someone go through tough times thanks to a certain song.
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post Jun 15 2017, 12:50 PM
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I don't know if they are trying to appeal to a younger generation.

20s-30s-early 40s is now becoming a larger music-buying market than younger people due to higher disposable income and more accustomed habits of buying music instead of streaming it or listening to it on youtube etc. Lots of younger people don't see the point of buying music any more just to own it when you could just listen to it on demand and not have to store it anywhere.

Who was buying the new Steps album? Classic pop music fans? The kind of music on that album was extremely similar to what they were known for at their height instead of jumping on e.g. a tropical house or chill R&B bandwagon and trying to be that. A lot of stereotypes of what people of a certain age do or are should really be changed soon, given that the current 30 and 40 somethings were born in the late 70s and early 80s, not the dark ages.

Like. They might pick up some new fans, but I don't think that's the main impetus of their resurgence, with the possible exception of Craig David from those listed. If they do, more's the better, of course.

I mean, I'm a little older. I'm not a teenager, and as a teenager I wasn't that much of a pop fan anyway. But I just can't see many of a current crop of 18-20 year olds rushing out to the shops or even to iTunes to buy a new single or album by The Corrs, or Geri Halliwell, a woman who's older than their mothers.

EDIT: What I also meant to say is, the idea of the 'Radio 2' audience should be shifted. We envision the typical radio 2 listener to be people in their 40s-50s with middle-of-the-road tastes and comfy woolly jumpers. But lots of modern people in their 30s, 40s and 50s aren't anything like that stereotype, because the stereotype is outdated.


This post has been edited by 360Jupiter: Jun 15 2017, 12:53 PM
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Liаm
post Jun 15 2017, 01:00 PM
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Music isn't all braindead teenagers who flock like sheep to the next Justin Bieber song... These people are making music generally for a diffferent demographic, so most of them sell quite well on albums and that's enough for them. Plus they've had their successes and probably have more than enough money in the bank, they want to make more music and please fans they've had for years. Not everyone needs to please new generations or hop on trends for hits.
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post Jun 15 2017, 01:04 PM
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Anxious to see the bank account situation of Martine McCutcheon
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Liаm
post Jun 15 2017, 01:05 PM
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She does Loose Women so I'm sure she's doing fine laugh.gif
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Tawdry Hepburn
post Jun 15 2017, 01:14 PM
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I remembered she was actually declared bankrupt a few years ago though.
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Liаm
post Jun 15 2017, 01:18 PM
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She wasn't on Loose Women then though, I assume that might be why only now is she going back into music, she's got a bit of money of money to cushion if (well, when) it flops laugh.gif
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post Jun 15 2017, 04:23 PM
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Craig David's comeback was carefully planned out from the beginning, was it not? Release a couple of easy hit modern-sounding club tracks with him on them (When The Bassline Drops being something of an old/new school fusion), getting his name back out there and letting early word spread, and once they're established, slowly transition into his own new material. It was basically the Jess Glynne path to success but relaunching an old star rather than unveiling a new one.

Comebacks usually happen when the singer or group have the right team on board to get the public to actually notice and the songs to be played. The Human League in 1994-5 was a great example of this - 'Tell Me When' was hyped up as their big return after a decade, but they'd never stopped making music, it had all just been ignored by the public for ages. Their new song got a shedload of radio play and smashed into the top ten, and then One Man In My Heart did equally well later that year. Granted music consumption has moved on a lot since then but the general methods still remain.
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