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> Eurovision Asia, ASIAVISION IS HERE
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AdamAloud
post Aug 18 2017, 02:20 PM
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QUOTE
Eurovision Asia is the Asia-Pacific version of the most spectacular television entertainment event in the world; the Eurovision Song Contest. The format is currently in development and today saw the launch of the official website EurovisionAsia.tv.

The EBU's production partners are working together to establish the Eurovision format in the Asia-Pacific region, bringing together up to 20 countries to compete in one extraordinary live annual Grand Final. Eurovision is coming to Asia!

When the Eurovision Song Contest was launched in 1956, just seven countries sent acts to compete. Today over 40 countries, from Iceland to Azerbaijan, take part in the annual music event. While the number of countries that can take part in the first Eurovision Asia has not been set in stone yet, the organisers of Eurovision Asia need your help!

Who do you want to see compete in Eurovision Asia? Visit EurovisionAsia.tv and let us know about your favourite Asian music, your favourite singers, songwriters and who you think could win!

In addition to the official Eurovision Asia website, you can also follow the official social media accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and you can also subscribe to the official YouTube channel. Don't forget to use the #EurovisionAsia hashtag to make your voice heard!

https://eurovisionasia.tv/

Not sure about the name (Eurovision Asia, really?) but OMG very excited for this!
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Liаm
post Aug 18 2017, 02:22 PM
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Omg YAS, imagine the incredible J and K-Pop we could get!!!

Eurovision Asia tho :')
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lotita
post Aug 18 2017, 04:49 PM
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Surely it would've been easier to call it Asiavision
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Ryan.
post Aug 18 2017, 04:54 PM
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It's all about the Eurovision brand. Eurovision is an actual organisation which the Song Contest is just one product of, so basically the Eurovision organisation is selling the product to another region of the world so it's still a Eurovision Song Contest, just not in Europe.
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*Tim
post Aug 18 2017, 05:35 PM
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Well bye Russia then laugh.gif
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Jonjo
post Aug 18 2017, 05:58 PM
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Omfg. YES. wub.gif

Nice to see some news, finally! wub.gif
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#CodyDecides
post Aug 18 2017, 06:08 PM
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Well THIS I can get behind!

Should be interesting to see which countries will take part!
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Northside Hisser
post Aug 18 2017, 06:30 PM
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QUOTE(*Tim @ Aug 18 2017, 06:35 PM) *
Well bye Russia then laugh.gif


Russia geographically is split though between Europe and Asia.

I know many want to see them gone from Eurovision Europe because of the reaction of some political figures there when Conchita Wurst won.
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Ryan.
post Aug 18 2017, 06:31 PM
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I imagine Russia will stay in Europe's contest, they have long-term ties to European competitions including Football etc. Australia is the curious one, surely they can't compete in both and they are the driving force behind the Asia contest so I imagine they might have to leave Europe.
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AdamAloud
post Aug 18 2017, 06:38 PM
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I hope the BBC broadcast this, if it got promoted properly I could see it being a success, at least the debut contest from curiosity. I fully expect them to ignore it of course.

QUOTE(Ryan. @ Aug 18 2017, 07:31 PM) *
I imagine Russia will stay in Europe's contest, they have long-term ties to European competitions including Football etc. Australia is the curious one, surely they can't compete in both and they are the driving force behind the Asia contest so I imagine they might have to leave Europe.


That's THE DREAM

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5 Silas Frøkner
post Aug 19 2017, 06:56 PM
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Australia have given more of a shit in 3 entires than the UK has since the end of the 90's. If anyone should be leaving it's the half-arsed dipshits at the BBC.



The name is a bit sketchy. I get that Eurovision is the brand but XYZ by Eurovision might have been a bit better.

Would be interesting to see if we get the America's and Africa in the future. One step closer to a true Worldvision super contest.
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LexC
post Aug 19 2017, 09:39 PM
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QUOTE(5 Silas Frøkner @ Aug 19 2017, 07:56 PM) *
Would be interesting to see if we get the America's and Africa in the future. One step closer to a true Worldvision super contest.


One Down already!
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5 Silas Frøkner
post Aug 21 2017, 10:11 PM
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Right America's, your move!
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THEO.
post Aug 30 2017, 12:29 PM
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I read this on Attitude recently and I have to say, I agree. Not here for this.

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‘Eurovision Asia is an insult to the competition's huge LGBT+ fanbase’

On Friday, organisers announced that everybody’s favourite song contest would be expanding east of Europe.

‘Eurovision Asia’ will, in the future, hope to bring Asian Cliff Richards and Brotherhoods of Men to the world’s screens.

The global expansion of the unashamedly camp brand seems, at first, an exciting prospect. Why not spend one more night of the year drunk on Bucks Fizz, passed out, draped in nothing but your nation’s flag? Well, the problem is that bringing the contest to Asia fails to appreciate how sacred Eurovision is to the LGBT+ community.

On top of gifting the world with a wide array of flare-trousered, neck-bearded singers, Eurovision, as we know, has also produced a number of gay icons. In 1997, the trans singer, Dana International, won the competition and became one of the world’s first trans superstars. In 2014, Conchita Wurst, sashayed her way to international fame and brought drag to the forefront of European pop culture.

These winners are, for many, a symbol of what Eurovision has come to be about. For a long time, Eurovision has been all about throwing glitter in the face of heteronormative convention and celebrating all of our differences. Year on year, European stadiums are populated by out-and-proud divas of all genders and sexualities, coming together to revel in the unorthodox.

In Europe, this celebration of diversity works. It’s legal to be gay in every single European country and, largely speaking, there is legal protection for those who identify as queer. In Asia, however, the same can’t be said. Being gay is rarely congratulated and, more often than not, coming out can put LGBT+ people in a dangerous and frightening situation.

How then can a competition built upon celebrating diversity take place in Asia?

As it stands, over 20 Asian countries ban any form of same-sex sexual activity. Only a handful of countries in the continent recognise same-sex unions and, in the vast majority of these nations, coming out can lead to ostracisation, assault or even life imprisonment.

Considering this, it seems absurd to me that the success of a competition that has effectively been kept afloat by its LGBT+ fans could be capitalised on by countries who don’t even offer these fans basic civil rights. How can a contest hope to celebrate differences, diversity and pure, unadulterated campness when some of its population can’t even openly express who they love?

Let’s say, hypothetically, Malaysia were to win the first contest. Doesn’t this mean that the following year’s contest would be held in a country where sodomy leads to twenty years in prison?

Perhaps one year China might win. The contest would then have to be hosted in a country where next to no legal protections are offered to LGBT+ in employment, the provision of services or against hate speech and violence.

And what about when Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India or Pakistan win – after all, these are just a small selection of the countries where same-sex sexual activity is outright illegal.

Realistically, there are perhaps only four or five countries in the continent who could host the contest and honestly say that they respect the right of all of their citizens to love who they want and to be proud of who they are.

Eurovision Asia simply can’t work because allowing it to take place would be to ignore what it has come to represent. The contest is, of course, not only for queer people but it has undoubtedly become a yearly celebration of self-expression, nonconformity and pride.

Permitting something so beautiful and so unifying to take place in a continent where these things are far from celebrated would be to disrespect the contest’s rainbow-coloured history and to undermine the horrific daily lives of many queer Asian people.
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Jerick
post Aug 30 2017, 01:07 PM
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That's honestly the most stupid thing I've read in a while...

To change the world, you have to start somewhere! Just think how the LGBT+ communities of Asia have been longing to see or be apart of something that celebrate diversity.

To do nothing, or to be silent is giving the power to the homophobic people.
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AdamAloud
post Aug 30 2017, 02:21 PM
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What a ridiculous article.

Same-sex marriage and adoption is still illegal in large parts of Eurovision's 'Europe' (including Switzerland!) so I don't like the tone that this article gives off that our part of the world is 100% there with LGBT+ rights. Japan allows LGBT+ people to serve in the military, Cyprus however, does not, yet Cyprus is a diverse, friendly Western European country supposedly?

If Eurovision in Asia could do what it did in Europe for bringing 'queerness' to an international audience, does Attitude magazine want to deny the LGBT+ communities there the opportunity for recognition just because their governments are, at the moment, largely 'anti-gay'? A very poor and unacceptable attitude for a gay publication to take in my opinion.
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5 Silas Frøkner
post Aug 30 2017, 03:14 PM
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There's a very west European slant to that article ignoring that while Netherlands, the Nordic nations and Mainland UK are all quite open and liberal and accepting (and a couple of others are pretty much but not quiet on the same level) the minute you cross into the east of the continent things change very rapidly. A lot of the east may have decriminalised same sex relationships but civil rights are iffy and acceptance is low. Especially when you consider Eurovision includes the Bastians of tolerance Belarus (only country on the continent that isn't a signatory to the ECHR) and Russia. Two well known hotspots for gay pride. And that's before you even consider people who don't conform to the gender binary or who ID as trans. Hell half of Western Europe still has a hella long way to come.

The article makes some valid points about concerns with attitudes towards the core Eurovision community and the contests values but utterly undermines it by painting an image of Eurovision being full of tolerant perfect nations.
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LexC
post Aug 30 2017, 04:30 PM
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That whole article is so Homonationalist it's making me feel ill. If we want to go mudslinging about who treats gays best then the article seems to conveniently forget the fact that anti-gay Hate Crime in England & Wales more than doubled in the past year, or how it was still illegal to be gay in Ireland as recently as 1993 which is really not that long ago at all.

Also same-sex marriage is (for the moment) not legal in Australia and yet they somehow have managed to avoid being chastised in that article. I WONDER WHY?
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Iz~
post Aug 30 2017, 07:47 PM
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I think it also has to be said that LGBT expression is not a stated aim of the contest, just a common byproduct because of the need to grab attention and the opportunity with that attention for identity so that an entry does well.

It'll probably surface in this Asian contest as those countries move towards greater acceptance and it may even be a big help in moving them towards such acceptance. The anti-gay laws and attitudes in Belarus, Russia and the rest of Eastern Europe has hardly stopped some of their entries being flamboyant and LGBT-empowering.

I do think it's very possible that the first few contests will be fairly conservative (somewhat along the lines of what I've heard of Turkvizyon) or otherwise only well attended by the likes of South Korea and Japan. But so were Eurovision's. Eventually, something will break through.

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