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> Are people too easily offended nowadays?
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Liаm
post Jan 15 2018, 02:53 PM
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This is always something that I think of in Big Brother season as Twitter goes off about something or another every episode, but I think it's pertinent in the wake of the H&M saga that has been discussed on here too.

The example that pushed me to this thread is Courtney Act and Andrew Brady on CBB, they are in a sort of banter/flirty friendship, Andrew is a straight guy and ofc Courtney is a gay guy/drag queen. In last night's episode Courtney pulled Andrew's jogging bottoms down in a playfight, he was unbothered and they both took it as a joke (both joked "that's assault" "no it's not") and kept laughing. Of course, some quarters of Twitter have to go off on one about how it's so inappropriate and awful... I get that assault for those who've been through it isn't a laughing matter, but I think in this case it's down to the person in question and he was fine - why does it always have to the business of everyone else? I know it's different on TV but i do feel sometimes people like to pick at what to be offended at today.

So even as a "liberal leftie", I'd actually say yes to the question. I don't think anyone should be able to dictate what is and isn't offensive based on someone's experiences, and of course if i comes to racism, homopobia etc. it's not the place of a white or straight person to say what is and isn't offensive, but there is an increasing culture of anything a bit close to the bone being hideously offensive and causing outrage I feel, especially as we have social media to spread things. For example, I've seen articles that people are calling Friends ridiculosuly offensive for the odd gay joke or a stereotype about women, among millennials watching for the first time. I think it's easy to see when something is humour and when it's genuinely offensive and everyone who cries about any given joke is just making it harder to speak up about actual injustices and discrimination etc. because that's when peole start labelling anyone who's slightly left as a "snowflake".

More to the point, there's FAR worse stuff in the world to worry about rather than being in a tizz at a few jokes.
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Andrew.
post Jan 15 2018, 02:59 PM
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As someone also on the liberal side of the debate these 'SJWs' are giving us a bad name. I doubt the ignorant bigots who say things like snowflake would stop even if SJWs were less of a presence online but it gives them fuel for their hate. I swear the amount of grown people I've heard saying 'did you just assume my gender' in a jokey way drama.gif
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Cody💧Slayberry
post Jan 15 2018, 03:08 PM
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YES.

Although it’s not just people being offended by every little thing and causing society to tread on eggshells but it’s also

1.) the extent that people go to in order to find something that offends them/validate their confirmation bias
2.) The extremity of their reactions

It’s grown increasingly true in the past few months where it’s lead to fans sending death threats to each other. Especially that Big Brother thing. They’re all acting as if Courtney committed genocide. I also saw a Tumblr post that vandalized a No Shave November poster with the intent of supporting women with body hair, which completely misses the point of NSN.
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T Boy
post Jan 15 2018, 07:17 PM
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I donít think people are more easily offended now but they are louder and have more avenues to express themselves with social media. I think, due to literally everything being online these days, there are people who feel they need to be seen being offended by things. They feel if they donít go on about how offended they are, people may think theyíre not offended enough and will be judged for it.

The commotion over Friends on Netflix interests me. There are a lot of teenagers watching it and going on about how itís homophobic, transphobic and fat shaming, and itís almost like theyíre judging older generations for not having such problems with the content. Itís quite amusing because, not only was it depicting life as it was between the late 90s and early 00s, but it was actually funny. Friends also was quite adventurous by exploring these topics, which were being ignored by other shows at the time. So what if Chandler didnít want people thinking he was gay? He wasnít, and didnít want people trying to set him up with men.

I feel people put a liberal stamp on themselves without really thinking about what that means. Itís all about what they appear to think in public. There is one poster that wades into the Eastenders thread with nonsense conspiracy theories about how the men always end up with the money and itís so sexist. In the next breath, this poster takes a potshot at Letitia Deanís weight and makes comment on The fact Tamzin Outhwaite actually looks 47 years old. Comment s like that take a shine off the battle against sexism and leave you wondering if that was all just for show.
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Brett-Butler
post Jan 15 2018, 07:44 PM
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Thanks to the internet & social media proliferation, taking offence has become a form of currency, a tradable commodity that can be exchanged for social, and occasionally, economic benefits. As long as that continues to be the case, then the culture of offence is only going to grow & grow, until there's a major backlash that will cost every one of us.

Now don't get me wrong. I can understand taking offence when someone really is being offensive to you directly (and not being offended on someone's behalf). And even I can get offended, for example when someone makes vile and vulgar remarks about my faith (even if they are not directly attacking myself). But I do feel that as a society, we do need to take things down a notch, which does sometimes mean we need to ignore that lovely,lovely hit of dopamine we crave by signalling one's virtue online (even if you feel the person it is directed towards deserves it), and just rise above it all. I know it's hard to do, but society as a whole will benefit from it.
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Doctor Blind
post Jan 15 2018, 10:41 PM
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Interesting point T Boy about Friends and how younger generations who never saw it at the time see it as quite offensive.

There is certainly some evidence to suggest that Generation Z (those born after 1998) are a lot more conservative and risk averse than the previous generation(s), some of this you may argue is great.. so lower teenage pregnancy levels (an absolutely massive drop-off between record highs in 2006 and 2016 to the lowest levels since records began!) and lower levels of alcohol and other drug consumption (In 2013, 66% of teenagers had tried alcohol, down from 82% in 1991.) - but yet at the very same time they are the most socially liberal of all generations. So you kind of have this dichotomy between increasing conservatism under increasingly liberal values .. therefore more offence taken ? I'm not sure if that explains it.
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Brť
post Jan 16 2018, 12:45 AM
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I find 'Friends' offensive for its incessant use of canned laughter at unfunny jokes xx but I don't think that's what this thread is about. basil.gif

In all seriousness there is certainly quite a lot of moral outrage over stupid things that don't really matter (the whole 'digital blackface' thing is a good example from fairly recently). I think in some ways it kind of distracts from the fight against actual racism. Kind of like a 'boy cried wolf' thing... if you declare every little harmless thing to be racist then people are less likely to take you seriously when you rightfully complain about things that actually are racist and harmful. I'm not an expert on this obvz but that's just my 2 cents ~
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LeeWallace
post Jan 16 2018, 12:49 AM
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YES.
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HarryEzra
post Jan 16 2018, 12:57 AM
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People are too "Social Warrior" now like you can't watch television shows with people finding the tiniest of details offensive rather than enjoyable. Don't get me wrong if something really is offensive than I get it but something its just misjudgments or things that are not really offensive.
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Lindsey 🙃
post Jan 16 2018, 03:00 AM
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It's a difficult one that's very much dependent on the situation imo. As a rule I feel like people can't be "oh you shouldn't feel offended about that" because things affect us all differently for various reasons, who is anyone to say how someone can and can't feel, it's like those bullshit appologies that are like "Im sorry you found this offensive" rather than apologising for being the one to offend. It's the backwards culture of victim blaming on a dilute level. In saying that, I think there is this mentality, purely due to social media really that everyone has to find something offensive in everything. It seems like a weird way of fighting for equality to most people, like "you can't say this because it erases or offends this specific type of person" which okay is good to point out but there is a line between doing that and then just trying to cause issues where there are none.

In your example of Shane and Andrew, I don't think that's something people should be offended over because both of the people actually involved were comfortable and having fun, that's so obvious. I'd feel differently of course if either one had been like "no that's not okay for you to do". Thats just an example of peoppe blowing things out of proportion to create unecessary drama i think, its reality TV so ofc they're gonna go hunting for things to pull people up on.

Keeping with the big brother theme, something that annoyed me was Ann's comments and then the further discussion of it on Twitter where she was like wolf whistling/cat calling is a compliment to women and people who are offended have just lost their humour and cheer. Like no. I couldn't believe the amount of people that agreed with it on Twitter, I do think it's gross and borderline harassment. It makes you feel uncomfortable and depending on the people who do it, it can be intimidating. If you want to compliment a randomer on how they look as they walk by, politely stop them and just say, the whistling is seedy af and should really be something of the past now. I get that not everyone feels that way and that's fine but there are people who do and I think those that are offended by it have formed that opinion because of past experiences they've either gone through themselves or their friends etc have.

I do also think a lot of arseholes use the excuse "you're just too easily offended" or "you need to grow a thicker skin" and the likes to justify their shitty behaviour, which is wrong and something I'm sick of seeing literally everywhere, it's trying to make the person they're offending out to be the one in the wrong for getting upset or whatever when the only person in the wrong is the one being offensive. Society should be more concerned about trying to get these people to stop being such arseholes and teach them how to treat people right rather than teaching people not to let them bother them or to "stand up" to them.
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JŁpiter
post Jan 16 2018, 03:06 AM
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People have different values. Of course people growing up in a different world will find things more glaring in old media than people did at the time if social mores have changed since. That's the whole point of shows like the ones yearly on channel 4 with clips of 'Things We Watched in the 60s/70s/80s' full of racist stereotypes, husbands hitting wives and this being a good thing, etc.

One from my own personal experience that catches me sometimes when watching older tv shows is when words like '$l*t' are just casually dropped in in casual conversation between characters. (Interestingly enough, I can't even type that word - rhymes with cut - without being censored on here now, which kinda proves what I'm talking about) I've noticed that a few times in really teen oriented shows like Buffy and the OC and it's a little shocking because that word has got stronger in terms of how its used in the intervening period.

I don't think people should try and suppress their reactions to stuff - if you're shocked by something, you are. But, I think it's good to as others have said, keep a sense of perspective too. An awareness that the context played a part and that certain content wasn't (necessarily) actively out to be malicious.

I think something else to keep in mind when judging people harshly for what they write online is, people might not be carefully considering and re-checking messages or posts before they write them. If people are coming from a place of shock or annoyance - or even just trying to provoke a reaction - that adds another dimension to what's said. Not being able to tell tone or emotion attached to words on a screen can really change the context of some things that are written and can lead to people on whatever side of the debate flying off the handle and making a mountain out of a molehill. Just my two cents on this.


This post has been edited by JŁpiter: Jan 16 2018, 03:08 AM
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vidcapper
post Jan 16 2018, 06:58 AM
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QUOTE(T Boy @ Jan 15 2018, 07:17 PM) *
The commotion over Friends on Netflix interests me. There are a lot of teenagers watching it and going on about how itís homophobic, transphobic and fat shaming, and itís almost like theyíre judging older generations for not having such problems with the content. Itís quite amusing because, not only was it depicting life as it was between the late 90s and early 00s, but it was actually funny. Friends also was quite adventurous by exploring these topics, which were being ignored by other shows at the time. So what if Chandler didnít want people thinking he was gay? He wasnít, and didnít want people trying to set him up with men.


Is nothing sacred? Friends was one of the most innocuous sitcoms around, and in some ways ahead of it's time in dealing with issues like those mentioned.

If some millennials find that show offensive, then no-one had better tell them about Alf Garnett! laugh.gif
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Popchartfreak
post Jan 16 2018, 11:17 AM
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Depends on the situation and the incident. Some are, some are just banter amongst friends. The TV incident in question is banter. If it was a complete stranger it would be potentially outrageous. Context is everything.

Friends is a comedy. Comedy mirrors society and makes comments. Satire attacks things that need attacking, or else, as someone with better skills than I commented, it becomes bullying. I never saw Friends as bullying, though the fat suit of a no-longer-fat hot Courtney Cox might not seem so funny to someone with weight issues.
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Liаm
post Jan 16 2018, 11:26 AM
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Well exactly, it's definitely context and that's my central point. Perhaps easily offended was the wrong way to word it, I think for me it's more this culture of being outraged on other people's behalfs, or at things that were "of their time", such as Friends (not that it's not a classic show still, but you know what I mean). You can't really bring something out of its native context and into yours just to claim it is offensive; I suppose my point is more about jokes and comedy. Of course there are all sorts of idiots in the world sharing all sorts of outdated, oppressive and offensive opinions, that deserves offense - a bit of a joke between two people or a harmless laugh on Friends probably doesn't.

"Easily offended" shouldn't be an excuse when a women is disgusted by catcalling or a trans person is misgendered or something, but it ends up being because of the amount of people who have to find offense in everything. It's a minority really but as always the awful minority gets coverage and they end up being the face of everything. Of course idiots should just not say and do these things in an ideal world laugh.gif
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vidcapper
post Jan 16 2018, 12:33 PM
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QUOTE(Liаm @ Jan 16 2018, 11:26 AM) *
Well exactly, it's definitely context and that's my central point. Perhaps easily offended was the wrong way to word it, I think for me it's more this culture of being outraged on other people's behalfs, or at things that were "of their time", such as Friends (not that it's not a classic show still, but you know what I mean). You can't really bring something out of its native context and into yours just to claim it is offensive;


A point I've made regularly on N&P, but they tend to tune me out when *I* say such things nowadays.


This post has been edited by vidcapper: Jan 16 2018, 12:34 PM
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Liаm
post Jan 16 2018, 12:42 PM
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Political correctness being flung about to anything and everything that has moved past the 1950s is a very different thing to the point of this thread laugh.gif
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Esmerelda
post Jan 16 2018, 12:49 PM
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I don't think the media help. One or two people on Twitter get offended by something and suddenly the media are running articles about "public outrage" and a "backlash" when it's just a couple of people on Twitter or the occasional troll journalist at the Guardian getting "offended" on everyone else's behalf.
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Liаm
post Jan 16 2018, 12:54 PM
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QUOTE(Esmerelda @ Jan 16 2018, 12:49 PM) *
I don't think the media help. One or two people on Twitter get offended by something and suddenly the media are running articles about "public outrage" and a "backlash" when it's just a couple of people on Twitter or the occasional troll journalist at the Guardian getting "offended" on everyone else's behalf.

Omg Digital Spy teas, their "journalism" is atrocious lately laugh.gif I think there was a thread about it actually not long ago, not even just this but it'll be like "fans DISGUSTED at teenager in documentary" but they just pick say 5 tweets and for all you know they could be the only 5. It's such a non-story and totally lazy journalism. I think those things should only be reported for stuff that gets an actual "backlash" like loads of Ofcom complaints, or at least some proper way like that to quantify it, of course sometimes Ofcom get ridiculous complaints for a pre-watershed gay kiss or something, but like who cares that two people on twitter thought Hollyoaks yesterday was shocking lmao
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Cqmerqn
post Jan 27 2018, 11:33 PM
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Iíll probably get shot for saying this but..

People are so easily offended when it comes to homophobia. We live in a society where it is perfectly normal and fine to be part of the LGBT+ community. There are always going to be some people who have different opinions, but thatís the same with everything in this world. When you compare homophobia to say, 50 years ago, to what it is like now, there has been SO much improvement. However, it just seems like people are becoming even more sensitive about it all.

As part of the LGBT community I find it genuinely interesting to listen to anti-gay people. I definitely do not agree with them at all, and think that their opinions are wrong, but I always find it interesting to learn what they have to say about it.

As someone mentioned on CBB a couple of days ago.. if we were all the same, life would be boring. We should stand up to anti-LBGT people without attacking them.

I really hope people donít get the wrong idea, because I definitely do not agree with outdated views regarding the LGBT community. I donít even know if many people will understand what Iím saying... but 🤷🏻‍♂️
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Liаm
post Jan 27 2018, 11:45 PM
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Jesus you have to be joking...

So just because we aren't getting sent to prison it's being easily offended to think that an "icon" saying two men flirting is "disgusting"? I'm sure you'd change your tune if someone was personally attacking a relationship of yours. I get that some people are products of their time and it is hard to change but they have to move with the times, it is not acceptable anymore to say that homosexuality, something nobody can help, is "disgusting" and we can't just let people off because "bless they're old it's not their time". Not least because these same people would say "SPEAK ENGLISH YOU'RE IN OUR COUNTRY" to a mother speaking to her own child in their first language, yet they can't move to live in our times...

Omg don't say that terrorist attacks are awful it could be worse at least it's not the Holocaust xx
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