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> Moving Out, What's your experience?
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lewistgreen
post May 19 2018, 04:47 PM
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So today, I put down for my first ever flat on my own and will be moving out of my parents home next month! cheer.gif I've done it already what with moving away to halls at uni and then into shared accommodation for the subsequent 2 years, but this just feels different and much more significant. Being 26 and still living at home just feels wrong now and you sort of know when the time comes to move on. I've certainly had that itch to move for the past 12 months! I've been saving since I left uni and so being at home in that respect has helped a lot, but I can't stay at home forever as I need 'some' independence laugh.gif My parents were 18 when they moved out of their respective homes to live together, and I know things were different (and MUCH cheaper) then, but I've just always felt behind everyone else who either owns or rents their own places, especially within my friendship group and extended family members.
I've been in a position where I had been looking online for ages and just had to bite the bullet and have now found somewhere that is close to work, but also close to my current home which is a bonus.
I'm very much looking forward to moving out... but there is an abundance of stuff to buy. Who knew there were so many styles of toaster and kettle?!

I wanted to ask, what were your experiences of moving out for the first time?
Any hints/tips?

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T Boy
post May 19 2018, 05:17 PM
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I was 23 last time I did a lengthy stint with my parents and that was pretty much against my will. I always had to share a room with my older brother (who just wouldn’t f***ing leave) so I was always wanting to move out. Once I got a permanent job that was it. I rented for about 4 years and have had my own house for almost 2 years.
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Brett-Butler
post May 19 2018, 05:36 PM
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I moved out of my parents house last year in my late 20s when I bought a flat, as I had enough money saved up to pay for a deposit, and property is relatively cheaper here, even in the nicer areas. The flat hadn't had much work done to it since it was built 30 years ago as the prior owners didn't do much work, so I'm still in the position of modernising the entire place - the next big job is getting a new boiler and switching from tank gas to piped gas, something which you can imagine is not a small job, although thankfully there's a grant available for it.

They did leave almost everything in the house though, from furniture and ladders to kettles & toasters, so I luckily didn't have to buy much once I moved in, but I've been replacing things as and when they need replacing.
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Doctor Blind
post May 19 2018, 09:13 PM
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I moved out at 21, and I was itching to escape back then. I don't know how you survived until 26!!

Tips? Hm, well set up direct debits for your bills (energy, phone/broadband, TV licence etc.) and try and make the day it goes out the day you get paid as that'll mean it is easier to budget each month (although it is depressing to see your money disappear immediately).
Get yourself a laundry basket - (http://offers.kd2.org/en/gb/lidl/pbdOU/) <LIDL used to have this one on offer. Helps reduce the temptation to throw clothes everywhere.. also definitely a proper pedal bin and not just hanging a bin bag over the back of the kіtchen door which is what a mate of mine used to do~
Most importantly- have a flat warming party to celebrate your new home!
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Mart!n
post May 19 2018, 09:20 PM
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You probably find friends and family giving you house warming gifts, just ask for kіtchen gadgets stuff that you need that's one way of getting your kіtchen on the way.
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Jade
post May 19 2018, 09:35 PM
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Best of luck with the move lewis!!

Can't even relate to the moving away for Uni thing as I decided that I wanted to commute to University - the idea of leaving home filled me with anxiety at 18. The thought of living in halls with a group of strangers was just a total nightmare for me. And that's okay, I'm not ashamed of it and I think in retrospect that it was definitely the right decision for me. I am proud of my academic achievements at Uni and have a great group of friends here nevertheless so I'm happy with my situation. Anyway, I feel like I've grown quite a bit as a person since then and the idea of having my own house does quite excite me now at 20. Need to sort out the whole full-time job after Uni thing first though kink.gif
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5 Silas Frøkner
post May 19 2018, 09:56 PM
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The first month will be hideously expensive. First month internet bill will be the largest - if you know the address of where you're moving to get it arranged now so that it's switched on for as close to the day you get there as possible. Most utility firms will set you up on at direct debit at a 'typical' level. Be punctual with meter readings and most will adjust your direct debits after a few readings to reflect your actual usage.

TV License can be paid by direct debit monthly as well as annually. There's no interest charged to spread the payments out so its worth it and you never need to worry about paying it out - you can get a refund if you've paid for part that you've not used. I got £85 back this month for payments i'd made on this years license.

Some local authorities will charge you council tax over 10 months (Dundee City Council & Fife Council) and others over 12 (Salford City Council). So your bill may be higher than you expect. Councils will often be slow on the uptake too so can take a month longer than you anticipate to set up your bill, which pushes up the monthly cost. My last flat the bill went from £81/m to £100/m because SCC took forever to react to me moving to a different flat at the same banding in the same building.

If you're having help to move from family with a car take advantage and get your first shop too (or start stocking up on things now ready for moving day) as your first shop will be the real f***er. Condiments, cooking staples, basic pantry necessities - all adds up in both cost and weight. Lidl/Aldi are your best friends. Cheap as hell and all the cleaning products/loo bleach/cling film/grocery staples are decent quality.

Tesco Value electricals aren't a happy ever after solution but they'll last you long enough to get on your feet and started. By the time they start to die off you should be in a better place financially and can spring for some nicer kit. The cheap shit will tide you over for the first few years though - don't waste cash you don't need to spend.

I agree with Dr Blind about the timing of your direct debits. It's better to see most of you cash disappear by day 5 than get to day 23 and wonder how you're gonna pay your bills. Excel (or it's free friend Google Sheets) make for excellent tools for tracking your budget and monthly expenditure.

You will never have 'everything' as there will always be that one thing you've forgotten to bring or buy. Don't stress trying to get everything immediately. Just cover the essentials, the rest can follow.



Biggest tip from me is to start an account with Quidco. Click this link and you'll get a bonus £5 cash back on your first transaction - https://www.quidco.com/user/2921902/2768525/ (open to all)

If you want a tv or internet contract go through Quidco. You can get a ridiculous sum of money back. My BT contract ended up costing me a net £5. I got a £40 boots voucher, £75 pre-paid mastercard (both offers from BT) and £185 cash back on Quidco. I've earned £621 so far with Quidco. Last cash out I did (~£400) paid for my flights to the states for my Holiday last year. You can get cash back on your home insurance, train fare, the works.
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vidcapper
post May 20 2018, 06:01 AM
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It can be summed up in one word : STRESS!
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lewistgreen
post May 20 2018, 01:57 PM
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Thanks guys! Genuinely useful stuff to bear in mind! The bills are what's going to catch me out and my pay day is usually around the 25th of the month so will try and align it with that somehow laugh.gif
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RabbitFurCoat
post May 20 2018, 02:41 PM
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I found to start with that I did spend money far quicker than it was coming in. I worked out exactly what bills and fixed outgoings (football season ticket, Spotify sub) I had, how much it cost me for the year then divided by 12 to work out what my actual disposable income is, and sticking to that. I much preferred doing it that way to actually have money to then be able to pay for the expensive one offs like insurances. At first I recorded everything I spent so I could work out how much I had left, and where things could be cut down if I realised I spent too much.

QUOTE(Doctor Blind @ May 19 2018, 10:13 PM) *
Get yourself a laundry basket - (http://offers.kd2.org/en/gb/lidl/pbdOU/) <LIDL used to have this one on offer. Helps reduce the temptation to throw clothes everywhere..

I absolutely have not found this to be the case.
QUOTE(Doctor Blind @ May 19 2018, 10:13 PM) *
also definitely a proper pedal bin and not just hanging a bin bag over the back of the kіtchen door which is what a mate of mine used to do~


A bag hung on the kіtchen door is fine, a bin would just get in the way.


This post has been edited by RabbitFurCoat: May 20 2018, 02:43 PM
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Tombo
post May 20 2018, 06:27 PM
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I hate living at home, I have been back since December and hating it for the whole time. I can't bare living here much longer, I need to get away.
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Dobbo
post May 20 2018, 10:17 PM
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I moved out 'properly' (i.e. not for Uni/travelling & then back) a few months ago & am really enjoying it! Just wanted to have enough of a nest egg to make that leap.

Tips? Well budgeting of course is essential as is keeping on top of laundry (altho there's a launderette on practically every main street these days so...) - and of course don't put raw chicken next to cooked chicken wink.gif
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Riser
post May 21 2018, 03:20 PM
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My twin brother moved out almost five years ago and I still haven't yet. kink.gif I know enough people my age (26) that are just now moving out so I honestly haven't felt much pressure to do so yet, plus my situation's pretty unique.

But from my experience it wouldn't hurt to hit up some garage sales and look for furniture/ kіtchen stuff you wouldn't mind getting used instead of brand new. That's a no-brainer so you're probably already doing this. laugh.gif And from my own planning permission perspective it's good to learn what rights you have, what you're allowed/not allowed to do and who to call when you have an issue with something, but inevitably you just learn that as you go along. Best of luck!
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Jüpiter
post May 21 2018, 08:33 PM
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You guys are going so late!

As someone who did it at 18, feel free to fire questions my way though if you can think of anything specific. It's hard to think back what would be the best advice to give. I guess as a baseline, be prepared for a bit of loneliness if it's a big change, and a lot more free time, and the complete loss/change of any schedule you're used to.
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