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> What will replace streaming?
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zenon
post Jun 9 2018, 08:55 PM
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From records to cassettes to CDs to downloads to streaming, is this how far music listening technology will go or is there another generation coming?
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Tombo
post Jun 9 2018, 08:57 PM
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Hologram music videos or something like that
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Dobbo
post Jun 9 2018, 08:58 PM
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Thinking a song.
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777666jason
post Jun 9 2018, 09:58 PM
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Chart manipulation where whatever is wanted to become a hit is psychologicaly projected/ implanted onto your brain

Or just think a song would count as a sale
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AcerBen
post Jun 9 2018, 10:01 PM
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I really don't see what can replace streaming. Even if in the distant future you could just think about the song you want to play, that'd still be streaming wouldn't it

This post has been edited by AcerBen: Jun 9 2018, 10:02 PM
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WhoOdyssey
post Jun 9 2018, 10:10 PM
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I think streaming will remain for a long time.

But what I do think will change are the artists being streamed. Younger people now will still be streaming when they are older, and they will likely be streaming older artists in the future.

If artists like Ed Sheeran stay relevant, I think he could quite easily have hits in 20 years time as his audience grow older with him.
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danG
post Jun 9 2018, 10:56 PM
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There'll probably be a divide between the 'Spotify generation' and whatever new service comes around in 10-20 years to appeal to the new kids.

I think whatever will be next will rely on some sort of future technology, it'd have to be really advanced like beaming a song directly into your brain or something. It won't come for at least another ten years.
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¡ʎpp∀
post Jun 9 2018, 11:17 PM
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Did we really predicted streaming will replace let's say in 2003/2004 when downloads started booming?
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Midge
post Jun 10 2018, 12:22 AM
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Well streaming really is just the next step on from downloading. To stream, you are effectively downloading it and playing it live. Internet connectivity has come a long way since 2003/2004.
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Dexton
post Jun 10 2018, 03:03 AM
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Beaming a song directly into your brain in ten years time? laugh.gif Fingers crossed for long distance teleportation and human regeneration while we’re at it

Streaming will stay for a long long time as an overarching music listening method. Spotify might get replaced as the “big bad in streaming” overtime by something else, maybe if Tidal changes up their price sheets or Apple Music. The only logical reason at this stage I can see people moving away from streaming music live is possible privacy issues with effectively having an open connection directly to your home/mobile. Alternatively the next World War (which will either be ridiculously tame or ridiculously brutal depending on how resistant nations are on releasing their weapons of mass destruction) will wipe out the general public’s access to internet and mean everyone has to go back to CDs, tapes, and records
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vidcapper
post Jun 10 2018, 05:27 AM
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QUOTE(AcerBen @ Jun 9 2018, 11:01 PM) *
I really don't see what can replace streaming. Even if in the distant future you could just think about the song you want to play, that'd still be streaming wouldn't it


How is that much different from simply remembering it? tongue.gif
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Bjork
post Jun 10 2018, 06:07 AM
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Bono said a few years back that he had this idea that was gonna be a revolution in music consumption and replace streaming biggrin.gif
think it was something more interactive with fans, but don't think he followed it thru biggrin.gif
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Grandwicky
post Jun 10 2018, 08:51 AM
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Maybe if the issues of artists not being paid enough and the fact no one has made a profit on streaming become a big issue then something like this could be a compromise?

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/may/...g-service-co-op

Music subscription service Resonate gives artists both money and power over content with a stream-to-own model

Jon Davies: ‘I tend to just not make any money from streaming.’

Jon Davies has set out on a career creating experimental music about the exploitation of people and the environment. Like many independent artists, Davies doesn’t expect to earn much profit from digital downloads or streams of his music, so he relies on a handful of side hustles to make a living.

He works five days a week as an usher at a local music venue in Liverpool. He also seeks out freelance writing gigs and performs at Cafe OTO in order to scrape together the £500 needed to pay his monthly rent and bills. Making money off his music online just isn’t in the picture.

“From my own experience, I tend to just not make any money from streaming [services],” Davies says.

He has been making music under the alias Kepla for around three years. He was searching for an alternative to big streaming platforms like Spotify, which pay artists tiny amounts of royalties per stream, when he came across Resonate.

Resonate, based in Berlin and established by founder and CEO Peter Harris in 2015, aims to put the money and power in the hands of the artists. It does this through three main selling points: an alternative to a monthly subscription service, an innovative technology that allows for a more transparent and efficient way of paying artists, and its cooperative model.

“It’s a protest against capitalism, it’s a protest against the Silicon Valley model of startups and platforms and, in some sense, it’s a protest against the way music is now being distributed and consumed,” Harris says.

Harris is a musician and electronic artist. After trying out his music on various streaming platforms, he realized that none could offer him the experience he wanted – so he created his own.

According to the Trichordist, each time a song is streamed by a listener on Spotify, the artist earns an average of $0.00397 in royalties – less than four-tenths of a cent. And yet, Spotify is the second most popular music streaming service, behind Apple Music, with 70 million paid subscribers worldwide.

“Many independent record labels have refused to go on record because they’re afraid that if they criticize Spotify, they’re somehow going to get blacklisted,” Harris says. “That’s a really dangerous power dynamic, and it also reveals that there’s a strong desire for something different.”

He says comparisons to Jay-Z’s Tidal, which also claims to give more power and profit to the artists, are off the mark.

“If they had gotten up onstage at [Tidal’s] big announcement and next to every one of those stars was someone totally unknown, and they’d said: ‘We’re going to build a service for the big names and people you haven’t heard of,’ then maybe Resonate would have never needed to exist,” Harris says. “The reality is, the artists who own it are a very small handful of extremely rich stars. We contrast that against Resonate, where every single artist and member owns it.”

Models like Spotify and iTunes aren’t built to sustain a class of artists
According to a 2014 report from MIDiA Research, 77% of recorded music revenue goes to the top 1% of artists.

“I’ve experienced firsthand how hard it is for artists from these backgrounds to actually make money,” says Natalia Linares, a board member for Resonate.

Linares worked in the music industry for 12 years as a publicist and manager for independent artists, experiencing how unfair the business is, especially for artists from minority backgrounds.

“It’s very exploitative, and models like Spotify and iTunes aren’t built to sustain a class of artists,” she says. “If [Resonate] can work, and we can build this and show that it is possible to build a platform that artists and listeners actually share and benefit from, that would be a huge contribution. It’s something worth fighting for and being a part of.”

Resonate is a cooperative, and because of that artists, board members and listeners all have stake in the company and participate in decision-making. According to its website, 45% of Resonate’s annual profit is distributed to artists, 35% to listeners and 20% to paid staff.

Resonate’s alternative to a monthly subscription service is based on a stream-to-own model. Listeners pay a cheap price for streaming a song for the first time, which doubles with each play until it is comparable to the price of a regular iTunes download, $1.29. After nine plays, the song is completely paid for, and the listener can download it from the service.

“It takes somewhere between 150 to 200 plays on Spotify to reach the price of an [iTunes] download, and we do that in nine,” Harris says.

Resonate also uses blockchain, the online ledger technology behind bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, to create a more transparent way of tracking and distributing payments as well as more user privacy and power over personal data and interactions on the service.

Blockchain allows for the use of “smart contracts”, which could be a more efficient and seamless method for paying artists.

“You can have a smart contract that says send 30% to the singer, 25% to the guitar player, and split up the rest among the other four members of the band,” Harris says. “The smart contract will receive the money then distribute it out instantly.”

Davies says the blockchain aspect is one of the main factors that drew him to Resonate.

“As an underground artist, [I think] it’s not good politics to be dismissive of a technology like the blockchain, which looks like it’s going to be – sooner rather than later – a very important way we not only approach things like currency, but also the way we approach contracts and agreements and the documentation of digital goods,” Davies says.

He believes Resonate will be more beneficial for artists once it catches on and as more people start to use it for streaming. Harris says the service has almost 5,000 total members, 1,000 of whom are listeners.

In March, Resonate received a $1m investment from RChain, a Seattle-based blockchain system cooperative, to further develop its technology.


I would expect something similar to this anyway where something other than just an all you can eat subscription to be the next evolution rather than a new format.
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AcerBen
post Jun 10 2018, 09:15 AM
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QUOTE(vidcapper @ Jun 10 2018, 06:27 AM) *
How is that much different from simply remembering it? tongue.gif


No, thinking about the song and it plays through your earphones (if that's possible) wacko.gif

Beaming something directly to your brain feels a bit unlikely. Surely we'll always need our ears? Something would still have to stream the song to you though?

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Dexton
post Jun 10 2018, 09:29 AM
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QUOTE(AcerBen @ Jun 10 2018, 05:15 PM) *
No, thinking about the song and it plays through your earphones (if that's possible) wacko.gif

Beaming something directly to your brain feels a bit unlikely. Surely we'll always need our ears? Something would still have to stream the song to you though?


It’d be like having a Bluetooth chip in your brain that your phone connects to and streams music to tongue.gif

On that note, our future is basically becoming Cybermen
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Evil Houdini
post Jun 12 2018, 03:10 PM
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Probably nothing. I can definitely see the Official Charts coming to a permanent end at some point though, it's not going to be timeless like other forms of entertainment such as Film.
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WhoOdyssey
post Jun 12 2018, 03:14 PM
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QUOTE(Evil Houdini @ Jun 12 2018, 04:10 PM) *
Probably nothing. I can definitely see the Official Charts coming to a permanent end at some point though, it's not going to be timeless like other forms of entertainment such as Film.

Honestly, I can't see anytime in the future where people don't listen to music.

I think people will stop watching films before they stop listening to music.
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Tawdry Hepburn
post Jun 12 2018, 03:24 PM
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Voting for 5 tracks per week on an app, by the middle of next decade. You heard it here first.
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Dobbo
post Jun 12 2018, 03:24 PM
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He's not saying the act of listening to music will stop, just the Charts! I myself think that would be quite extreme but not unthinkable in the distant future.
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Evil Houdini
post Jun 12 2018, 03:28 PM
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QUOTE(WhoOdyssey @ Jun 12 2018, 04:14 PM) *
Honestly, I can't see anytime in the future where people don't listen to music.

I think people will stop watching films before they stop listening to music.

Of course people wont stop listening to music. What I mean is that the Official music chart will not be timeless like how the Box Office chart for films is. Nobody has ever f***ed about with the formula for the Box Office chart like they have done so many times with the Official music chart. People in general are losing lot of interest in the music charts but it's not the case for the Box Office chart.
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