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> Body Language ● 15 Years
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Liam.k.
post Nov 10 2018, 11:27 AM
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Today marks 15 years since the release of Kylie's ninth studio album, Body Language. Tasked with the challenge of creating an album that could replicate the scorching success of Fever, Kylie made an unconventional turn. Body Language fuses electro-pop and urban music, exploring the moody mid-80s dance scene and injecting influences of R&B and hip-hop. It's an understated and intimate affair, moving away from the immediate, club-ready sounds of her post-millennium catalogue and offering stylish, seductive grooves and melodies that invite you in and gradually coil around you. The album houses three singles, including the sultry, sexy 'Slow' as its lead - a UK and Australian #1 that remains as timeless now as it did in 2003.

Body Language is the work of an artist who is eager to experiment and willing to take a risk. It would have been easy for Kylie to release a Fever Mark II, but Kylie's creative prowess is what has kept her an enduring force in pop culture and it's what has eased this album into the hearts of many fans. Happy Birthday Body Language.

Tracking list:

01. Slow
02. Still Standing
03. Secret (Take You Home)
04. Promises
05. Sweet Music
06. Red Blooded Woman
07. Chocolate
08. Obsession
09. I Feel For You
10. Someday
11. Loving Days
12. After Dark
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Tawdry Hepburn
post Nov 10 2018, 12:18 PM
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I can see the criticisms with this album as it does sort of seem for the most part like an album of recycled demos, but I enjoy it a lot and think it's a strong set (aside from 'Someday' and 'I Feel For You'). I do really admire her for taking such a real risk after Fever though.

Offering my usual HOW AND WHY WAS 'SECRET (TAKE YOU HOME)' NOT A GOD DAMN SINGLE comment. A crime.


This post has been edited by Tawdry Hepburn: Nov 10 2018, 12:27 PM
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Red Blooded Man
post Nov 10 2018, 01:19 PM
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The Money Can't Buy concert was one of her best shows, and all the costumes were just perfect.
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___∆___
post Nov 10 2018, 01:37 PM
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Not my favourite Kylie era but I appreciate it for what it is - we got the gem ‘Slow’ but the album feels all over the place with some serious low points, I guess it felt more disappointing at the time after she was following up a pure pop album.
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Dannyboy
post Nov 10 2018, 01:37 PM
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For me this is the worst album she ever released, the only highlights are Slow and Loving Days
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Calum
post Nov 10 2018, 01:38 PM
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The album that gave us the best song of her career - Red Blooded Woman heart.gif
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SmileyKylie
post Nov 10 2018, 01:45 PM
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I think Slow, Chocolate and Red Blooded Woman did well after the Fever era.

1,5 and 6 in UK Charts

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Feel_The_Fever
post Nov 10 2018, 04:23 PM
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It's not a bad album but it wasnt the follow up I wanted after fever,body language for me is like a good version of kiss me once.
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slowdown73
post Nov 11 2018, 11:30 PM
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The problem with this album was that it was too Americanised - A ploy by the record company to try and strike while the iron was hot and establish Kylie more in the USA. It didn’t achieve anywhere near the success of Fever and although there are some good tracks, the urban sound didn’t always work. Slow is the best track and doesn’t really fit with the overall sound of the album. I don’t like red blooded woman and on chocolate her voice is too whispery. Highlights include loving days (which would have easily fitted on impossible princess), obsession and secret (take you home).
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Feel_The_Fever
post Nov 12 2018, 02:58 AM
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When Kylie tries to make an album to suit a particular audience it never works nearly aswell as when she just makes an album she wants to make. For me, Body Language and Kiss Me Once were a chasing an audience style of album where most her other albums were right for her at that particular time.

You can clearly see Kylie is behind Golden and is enjoying it but she never gave off that vibe during Kiss Me Once.
During Body Language Kylie did seem to be behind it but overall the album just didnt click with people and only releasing 3 singles at that particular time showed the record company knew that too.
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pippa
post Nov 13 2018, 02:46 PM
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I do agree that Kylie seemed to be trying too hard on this album to adapt its style for the American market which we know didn't work.
As a result she likely dwindled some of the potential UK, European and Australian success she could have had if she made the album more suited to the those markets.
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Nina West
post Nov 13 2018, 11:17 PM
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I find this album very hit & miss, not one of her best by quite a long shot and at the time I wasn't very keen on it, especially following her commercial peak of 'Fever' & of course her career best 'Light Years', sadly this just doesn't compare to their brilliance. Now though you can appreciate it more as a body of work and it is one of her most interesting eras of her career and it does offer some really decent tunes.

The first half of the album is where all the best and strongest songs are, but after 'Chocolate' it just loses its way, apart from 'Loving Day's, the 2nd half is just very weak. 'Slow was the best way to lead the project, even if it doesn't represent the album all that much. Still a cracking tune though and it's a shame that the album didn't follow this sophisticated synth pop round, then it would have been much better received in My opinion.

'Still Standing', 'Secret (Take You Home)' [should have been A single], 'Promises', 'Red Blooded Woman', 'Sweet Music & 'Loving Days' are the best tracks on this, especially 'STYH', which has to remain one of her biggest missed opportunities and would have been a much better choice than the simply average and weird 'Chocolate'. So on the whole this album is just OK.'
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Liam.k.
post Nov 26 2018, 08:11 PM
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It's taken a long time but I can confidently say I really like this album now. It's strange how the things I once disliked are now the things that make the album so appealing. I like that it's a slow-burning record; the melodies and grooves work on you and there's opportunity for the lyrics to take more of the spotlight. It's a flirty, sexy album. It's not full-on dance but not completely relaxing either and there's times where you want to listen to something that's got that in between mood, to which this album accommodates.

I'd say the first half is the stronger side, interestingly where Kylie sticks more electropop sounds as to R&B, although I've got to say I do like everything. I'd probably still switch the likes of 'I Feel For You' and 'Someday' for 'City Games', 'Cruise Control' and 'Slo Motion', three songs that are quite R&B but suit the rest of the album well too, as well as supplying a more immediate catchy sound.

Couple of things I wanted to share, one, an insightful review of Body Language with various perspectives and, two, a 15th anniversary review from Albumism.



https://www.albumism.com/features/kylie-min...y-retrospective

QUOTE
Kylie Minogue’s ‘Body Language’ Turns 15 | An Anniversary Retrospective
November 8, 2018 Quentin Harrison

Happy 15th Anniversary to Kylie Minogue’s ninth studio album Body Language, originally released November 10, 2003.

On November 15, 2003, just five days after its release, Kylie Minogue gave a “one-night only” live showcase for her ninth studio affair, Body Language. Housed for the evening within the prestigious halls of the Hammersmith Apollo in London, the audience for the “Money Can’t Buy” concert was made up of journalists, colleagues, family and die-hard fans. Never had Minogue put on such a grand exhibition for the disclosure of a record, then again, Body Language was a unique collection of compositions as exciting now as it was then. But, Body Language had not happened by accident or by design. Rather, it was actualized by several different career events.

Later to be rightfully canonized as pioneering, Minogue’s deConstruction Records epoch was seen, by and large, as a commercial misstep when it concluded. So, when she inked a deal with Parlophone Records in 1999, her mission was to make long players with a thoughtful, but mainstream appeal. Light Years (2000) and Fever (2001) followed making good on this intention and they triumphed.

Outwardly, Minogue was content with her newfound power. However, one could assume that the itch to create in a less constricted way hadn’t completely left her. Closer listens to Light Years and Fever gave credence to this theory as there was a markedly subversive current running beneath both albums. In 2003, as Minogue began to plot and plan her ninth recording, she tapped back into the artistic abandon of her deConstruction expanse, but tempered it tactfully with a chart consciousness gained from her recent experiences.

The past and the present became sources that Minogue aurally drew from for Body Language—initially titled City Games—as it took shape. The former aspect looked to a specific stretch in popular music (1985 to 1987) when freestyle, synth-funk and electro-hop reigned. The latter aspect had its eye “on the moment” as it related to tonally variegated electro-pop and dance music. Minogue sent out the call for collaboration to help her whisk these disparate elements into one groovy gestalt.

Cathy Dennis, Johnny Douglas, Green Gartside (of Scritti Politti), Kurtis Mantronik, Karen Poole, Richard Stannard and Ash Thomas were only some of the songwriting/production/cooperative luminaries to answer Minogue’s hails. The appearance of Gartside and Mantronik is significant, each were prominent figures from the halcyon ’85 to ’87 period Minogue was referencing. Having them present on Body Language brought legitimacy to the sessions; Gartside gifted his vocals to “Someday,” while Mantronik gifted Minogue with “Promises” and “Obsession”—all three cuts were highlights. Of all the Body Language entries across its assorted international pressings—and the B-sides earmarked for the record’s three singles—Minogue features as a co-writer on nine of them.

As the song cycle developed, it became a curiously compelling study in supposed musical contrasts that, with Minogue’s supervision, found itself convincingly blended into an esoterically charged set. Body Language’s introductory number, the simmering, midtempo synth jam “Slow” unabashedly displays Minogue’s affection for (and command of) modish electro-pop. The track’s snake-like bassline, however, yielded an irrepressible rhythm and blues vibe that felt more pronounced than ever before. R&B wasn’t completely new for Minogue; it had contributed handsomely to certain sides of Minogue’s last two antecedent albums and been a major factor in the innovative air of Kylie Minogue (1994). Yet, the urban-pop immersion of Body Language rendered those past interactions with the genre demure in comparison.

And so, in this way, the record strikingly carries on in mixing digitized soul with crisp live instrumentation—as heard best on “Still Standing”—or taming the sample savvy hip-hop beats of “Secret (Take You Home).” The two cuts blow reverent kisses to the likes of “Skin Trade” era Duran Duran and early Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam with Full Force. Still, Body Language doesn’t restrict itself to retro-modernist fusion strategies. Layered noir ballads (“Chocolate”) and ambient song pieces in a wealth of organic (“After Dark”) and inorganic (“You Make Me Feel”) textures are spread out throughout the LP making it uniform in tone, but diverse in function.

Vocally, Minogue uses the upper range of her voice to aesthetically color the engrossing lyrical pictures on the record of romance either for her craft (“Sweet Music”) or for an individual (“Loving Days”). While this may not be to everyone’s tastes, it does evince one of the many risks Minogue willingly embraced on Body Language and grants it the distinction of being her most sensual project to date.

Preceded on November 3, 2003 by its first smash single “Slow,” Body Language manifested in nearly all global markets the following Monday. America received the record a few months later in February of 2004. Even though Body Language had enough of a general commercial surface to make it chart accessible, the LP did not bow to the unspoken demand that Minogue recreate what had come before. As such, sales and notices for it were respectable, but lacked the enthusiasm that greeted Fever. Two further singles emerged during the lifespan of Body Language in “Red Blooded Woman” and Chocolate,” both yielding healthy returns in numerous singles charts around the world.

Accordingly, with the passage of time, Body Language has outstripped all of the hurdles that initially impeded it. Besides its singles becoming perennial performance pieces in Minogue’s concerts years afterward, the album’s experimental heart now finds favor and complementary comparisons to the peaks of her deConstruction phase. Written, recorded and released at a time when Minogue could have done a textbook redux of her most successful album, the ever-enterprising pop vocalist instead drafted one of the subtlest and most creatively defiant vehicles within her canon.
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pippa
post Nov 26 2018, 08:39 PM
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"the ever-enterprising pop vocalist"sums up Kylie beautifully.
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