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> Charts split by age group?
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vidcapper
post May 4 2019, 07:04 AM
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Paul Hyett
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Wonder how they would look?

Say split as follows :

Under 18
18-30
31-45
46-60
Over 60

I assume the singles would differ more by age than albums. unsure.gif
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Poptarttreat
post May 4 2019, 07:21 AM
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wouldn't work - that a 16-year-old might have hits isnt relevant if they are being written and produced by 50-year-olds. 14-year-olds have always tended to opt for young stars nearer their age - which is why singles charts reflect that - and albums have always been the domain of older people earning a wage as they have generally been more expensive - bar the times when the music industry killed off the single to force album sales. The music industry has always targeted and created young stars to fulfill the teeny needs, but generally the youngsters aren't in control. The self-determining ones are quite rare at the start of their careers - though they are there, from Kate Bush types and DIY bands.

Plus, when I was very young I didn't care what age anyone was (I'm not typical) I was just as happy to love The Osmond Brothers (all under 18 when they started) or The Jackson 5 as I was Donald Peers, a star from the 20's and 30's, or Walter Brennan a pensioner movie star, and I'm just as happy to opt for Billie Eilish or stars in their 90's if they release good music nowadays.

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Draculadracula
post May 4 2019, 07:40 AM
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spotifycharts used to provide demographic data way back when it first launched. I have a bunch of old charts saved on my computer with this data, which looks a bit like this:

(+55 data is clearly people putting false information on their profiles so it may as well be ignored)

Generally pretty much the whole top 200 had similar demographic splits, even older stuff like Queen & Oasis. There were a few divergences, like you can see 5SOS on this image (though maybe nowadays with their new music they'd be just like everyone else!), and lower down Foo Fighters skewed a bit the other way. These occasionally scattered data percentages would be offset a bit by the fact that the bigger songs have far bigger numbers. It probably wouldn't be out of the ordinary to have the same song at #1 for every age group regularly, even if it feels like it's just for a younger audience. As a side note, I often wondered with this if you'd see the demographics shift older in accordance with how younger listeners are seen as more frivolous and older listeners latch onto hits after the fact and never let go (or maybe that's just adult contemporary radio), but there's surprisingly little change over time in that regard either.
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vidcapper
post May 4 2019, 09:50 AM
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QUOTE(Dircadirca @ May 4 2019, 08:40 AM) *
spotifycharts used to provide demographic data way back when it first launched. I have a bunch of old charts saved on my computer with this data, which looks a bit like this:

(+55 data is clearly people putting false information on their profiles so it may as well be ignored)

Generally pretty much the whole top 200 had similar demographic splits, even older stuff like Queen & Oasis. There were a few divergences, like you can see 5SOS on this image (though maybe nowadays with their new music they'd be just like everyone else!), and lower down Foo Fighters skewed a bit the other way. These occasionally scattered data percentages would be offset a bit by the fact that the bigger songs have far bigger numbers. It probably wouldn't be out of the ordinary to have the same song at #1 for every age group regularly, even if it feels like it's just for a younger audience. As a side note, I often wondered with this if you'd see the demographics shift older in accordance with how younger listeners are seen as more frivolous and older listeners latch onto hits after the fact and never let go (or maybe that's just adult contemporary radio), but there's surprisingly little change over time in that regard either.


Thanks for that - very interesting.
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