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> Should 16/17 year-olds be allowed to vote in UK?
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Should 16/17 year-olds vote?
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common sense
post Oct 27 2019, 08:06 PM
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The Lib-Dems think so. I say an emphatic NO. They are still legally classed as children. Yes they can marry, with parental permission, but can't drink legally, get a bank loan or enter in to a contract. 16 year-olds can't drive either.

This post has been edited by Freddie Kruger: Oct 27 2019, 08:09 PM
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dobbo
post Oct 27 2019, 08:09 PM
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I agree, no.
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LaJŁpe
post Oct 27 2019, 09:12 PM
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If you can get married you should be allowed to vote.

The legally classed as children thing is stupid anyway. That's just an excuse for older people to feel superior and look down their nose, 'at least I'm not a CHILD' kind of thing. I've never had any patience for that kind of shite.
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dandy*
post Oct 27 2019, 09:21 PM
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I honestly don't know. You have to have a cut off point somewhere and I feel like 18 is a fair enough age. I wouldn't be against it if it changed to 16 or 17 but I'm not passionately for it either.
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Chez Wombat
post Oct 27 2019, 09:25 PM
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Yeah, I'm a bit on the fence here, I do see the arguments for either side but I would probably lean towards 'no' though as there is quite a difference between 16 and 18 despite how it may seem, and the level of political education/information to this age group just isn't what it should be (I know, I work with them).
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dandy*
post Oct 27 2019, 09:31 PM
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I think thatís the problem Chez. Iím not sure I understood enough about politics even at 18, never mind about 16. Thatís not to say 16 year olds canít but Iíd probably say most wonít.
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ElectroBoy
post Oct 27 2019, 09:52 PM
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QUOTE(dandy* @ Oct 27 2019, 09:31 PM) *
I think thatís the problem Chez. Iím not sure I understood enough about politics even at 18, never mind about 16. Thatís not to say 16 year olds canít but Iíd probably say most wonít.


I doubt most people who vote understand enough about politics. And i'm doubly sure that a load of people who voted leave didn't have a clue either.

I'm for it; to be honest I think 16 is perfectly reasonable. If the age of consent is 16 and therefore make life changing decisions like that (and the consequences it can bring), then why the heck shouldn't you have a say in other things that affect your life
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dandy*
post Oct 27 2019, 10:27 PM
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That is a fair counter argument. You are right that there are a lot of adults who don't have a clue what they are voting for either.
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Jordan Lee
post Oct 27 2019, 10:56 PM
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I think yes.

But they should be given information before hand from someone impartial who wonít sway their vote one way or other. When I was younger Iíd just vote what my mam and dad did itís only now I understand a bit more I can form
Better opinions.
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LaJŁpe
post Oct 27 2019, 10:57 PM
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If people with dementia and Alzheimers can vote then people sitting their GCSEs should be allowed to.
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ElectroBoy
post Oct 27 2019, 10:58 PM
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QUOTE(Jordan Lee @ Oct 27 2019, 10:56 PM) *
I think yes.

But they should be given information before hand from someone impartial who wonít sway their vote one way or other. When I was younger Iíd just vote what my mam and dad did itís only now I understand a bit more I can form
Better opinions.


Maybe the unbiased newspapers could send them some information laugh.gif

I hear the Sun and all the other media outlets owned by Rupert Murdoch corporation give very balanced views to everyone in society
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Jade
post Oct 27 2019, 11:05 PM
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I always thought 'no' in the past as age 16 to 17 seemed like too much of an immature bracket, with poor political teaching at school and not reaching official adulthood yet. But I think the whole Brexit fiasco has changed my mind in recent times. Many people who feel as clued up as the rest of us (I mean realistically how clued up can one be about Brexit) narrowly missed out on the vote because they were 17 at the time... this is going to impact the lives of these people now in their 20s more in the long-term than the 80-year-olds who did vote in 2016, who won't be on the planet anywhere near as long. Not being agiest or anything, 80-year-olds have just as much of a right, but I think the younger generation should too. Obviously there needs to be a cut-off point, so I think 16+ would be good, as you do get other privileges at 16 too so it feels consistent enough.
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LaJŁpe
post Oct 28 2019, 12:09 AM
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Lmao is this the return of ageist Jupiter oops :')
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Tones and Iz
post Oct 28 2019, 12:22 AM
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Yes! Expanded electorate, more chance for younger people to be interested in politics earlier, nothing makes people more apathetic than being told they can't take part. I think it would be a great step at raising younger people's trust in the government.

it keeps coming up, I'm sure it will happen at some point.
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vidcapper
post Oct 28 2019, 06:09 AM
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QUOTE(Tones and Iz @ Oct 28 2019, 12:22 AM) *
Yes! Expanded electorate, more chance for younger people to be interested in politics earlier, nothing makes people more apathetic than being told they can't take part. I think it would be a great step at raising younger people's trust in the government.

it keeps coming up, I'm sure it will happen at some point.


But there's lower turnout even amongst the youngest groups that're eligible to vote now (18-21), so why would lowering the age help engage them? At that age their main concerns are A-Levels/Uni/having a good time/getting laid. tongue.gif

Seriously though, with hindsight, were posters here responsible enough to take on adult responsibilities at 16 - including signing contracts, being tried as adults, marriage, etc? I can honestly say I wasn't, and not just with hindsight. I was always glad the parental safety net was there, whether or not I had to use it.

As for the trust in gov't issue, the sooner they learn they *can't*, the better.

I suspect the lowering of voting age will eventually happen, but I am far from convinced that a majority of under-18's are responsible enough to handle it.
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Tones and Iz
post Oct 28 2019, 08:55 AM
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QUOTE(vidcapper @ Oct 28 2019, 06:09 AM) *
But there's lower turnout even amongst the youngest groups that're eligible to vote now (18-21), so why would lowering the age help engage them? At that age their main concerns are A-Levels/Uni/having a good time/getting laid. tongue.gif

Seriously though, with hindsight, were posters here responsible enough to take on adult responsibilities at 16 - including signing contracts, being tried as adults, marriage, etc? I can honestly say I wasn't, and not just with hindsight. I was always glad the parental safety net was there, whether or not I had to use it.

As for the trust in gov't issue, the sooner they learn they *can't*, the better.

I suspect the lowering of voting age will eventually happen, but I am far from convinced that a majority of under-18's are responsible enough to handle it.


A lot of the time, going from 16 to 18 includes wanting to be treated like an adult/not patronised. It's a transitive age with varying responsibilities opening up to you along that line. Voting sits in that niche of being a societal issue that will be participated in by (some) teenagers if allowed, but ignored if not, unlike some others like driving or alcohol. They will go through this transitive stage ignoring politics more than they would have. Yes, perhaps we'd have low turnout from the age group, but those that do vote would be glad of the opportunity. Those that aren't responsible, well, we tolerate irresponsible voters no matter what age they are.

I think I didn't quite mean trust in government, but well, a greater trust in how society works. It is arbitrary right now, no less arbitrary when moved down, but it will exclude far fewer who are politically aware. And arbitrary rules invoke dissatisfaction and could be the starting point towards seeing things that lead to political apathy.
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5 Silas FrÝkner
post Oct 28 2019, 09:34 AM
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Im in favour of this and Scotland has already done so for all votes that it has the delegated responsibility of organising and deciding the franchise of.

Would far rather a 16 year old that a 96 year old got the vote in the EU referendum. One has to live with the consequences for 80 years, the other has far f***ing less
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blacksquare
post Oct 28 2019, 12:00 PM
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QUOTE(dandy* @ Oct 27 2019, 09:31 PM) *
I think that’s the problem Chez. I’m not sure I understood enough about politics even at 18, never mind about 16. That’s not to say 16 year olds can’t but I’d probably say most won’t.


There is no age in which people understand politics — most people don't. Generation Z seems far more politically engaged than any before them, and there are genuine concerns for the future they're going to live in.

QUOTE(Tones and Iz @ Oct 28 2019, 12:22 AM) *
Yes! Expanded electorate, more chance for younger people to be interested in politics earlier, nothing makes people more apathetic than being told they can't take part. I think it would be a great step at raising younger people's trust in the government.


100%

I'm surprised people are so on the fence on this! There is more chance of a 16-year-old becoming more engaged with current politics than someone in their nineties who is likely to vote as they always have without doing any research.


This post has been edited by blacksquare: Oct 28 2019, 12:00 PM
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Big Boobs Vjay!
post Oct 28 2019, 12:01 PM
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QUOTE(dobbo @ Oct 27 2019, 08:09 PM) *
I agree, no.


Wtf?? laugh.gif

They should. The end x
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vidcapper
post Oct 28 2019, 04:06 PM
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QUOTE(blacksquare @ Oct 28 2019, 12:00 PM) *
I'm surprised people are so on the fence on this! There is more chance of a 16-year-old becoming more engaged with current politics than someone in their nineties who is likely to vote as they always have without doing any research.


If they are truly engaged on politics, then as they grow older they will as their judgement as to whether gov'ts deliver on their promises, and if they don't, change their vote. that is what a lot of voters do!
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