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ben08
post Jan 1 2020, 07:53 PM
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UK recorded music market up 7.5%, hits 114 billion streams in 2019

From Music Week



The UK recorded music market has just had its fifth consecutive year of growth.

According to the BPI and Official Charts Company data, consumption across all formats was up 7.5% year-on-year for volume in 2019. Based on the yearís AES total, the equivalent of 153.5 million albums were either streamed or purchased in the last 12 months. The annual rate of increase is up on the 5.7% recorded in 2018.

Streaming equivalent albums (SEA) increased by 26% year-on-year to 114.2m units, 74.4% of the AES total (the industry metric used to measure sales and streams on a comparable basis). December saw the highest weekly total of streams Ė 2.7 billion Ė ever recorded, and the 2019 total of 114 billion plays on audio streaming services marks the first time the 100 billion landmark has been surpassed in a year.

In contrast to the streaming result, physical sales were down 22.8% year-on-year and now account for less than 20% (18.2%) of the total. CDs slumped by 26.5% year-on-year to 23.5m units, although the value of boxsets will likely soften the blow.

Digital albums were down 28.2% to 7.3m units, as the industry faces up to a future in which downloads are likely to be a niche business. Digital albums now account for 4.8% of the total, compared to 21.1%in 2015.

Vinyl LP sales rose for a 12th consecutive year, with Liam Gallagherís Why Me? Why Not the most in-demand title, selling over 29,000copies. The top 10 included new album releases by Billie Eilish and Lewis Capaldi, alongside catalogue classics such as Joy Divisionís Unknown Pleasures and Queenís Greatest Hits. Vinyl LPs now account for one in every eight albums bought, with 4.3m purchased in 2019 Ė up 4.1% on the previous year and a rise of over 2,000% on the formatís low point in 2007.
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___∆___
post Jan 1 2020, 09:10 PM
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Saw that on MW earlier and it made it onto the news today - can only be a positive for the music market.

I do wonder how sustainable the model is though? I was for 20+ years a VERY heavy spender on music and now I pay £10 a month for streaming, a lot less than I used to spend monthly on physicals and downloads.

Also I have had so many free premium subscriptions - 3 months initially with Apple and then a further 6 months free with my mobile contract, Iíve now switched over to Amazon - 99p for 3 months...
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slowdown73
post Jan 1 2020, 11:28 PM
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I donít stream at all and never will. I can see the benefits of streaming but I prefer buying all my music on CD. To some extent, streaming has ruined the music industry as album sales have fallen through the roof because people no longer want to buy the physical product to the same degree. Stores like HMV May struggle to survive in the future if streaming continues to dominate.
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vidcapper
post Jan 2 2020, 08:42 AM
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QUOTE(slowdown73 @ Jan 1 2020, 11:28 PM) *
I donít stream at all and never will. I can see the benefits of streaming but I prefer buying all my music on CD. To some extent, streaming has ruined the music industry as album sales have fallen through the roof because people no longer want to buy the physical product to the same degree. Stores like HMV May struggle to survive in the future if streaming continues to dominate.


Will we ever get a million-*selling* (as opposed to sales + streams) album (*) again?

(*) Artist album

Adele might be able to pull it off, but if even Ed Sheeran couldn't, who else?

BTW, I only use free streaming, and that only rarely - I prefer CD's on the occasions I do buy music.


This post has been edited by vidcapper: Jan 2 2020, 08:45 AM
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SKOB
post Jan 2 2020, 08:50 AM
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This is interesting interview of Jimmy Iovine about the hot topics in the music business:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/30/arts/mus...pop-decade.html
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Mr. C. Joel
post Jan 2 2020, 08:57 AM
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I actually hate CDís itís so much easier and cost effective streaming.

I would be surprised if they just stop making cdís before long.
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Bjork
post Jan 2 2020, 10:02 AM
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but sure they count streams from playlists into album streams so not a real measure of album streams
albums like Clean Bandit or Rita Ora can get 150,000 fake sales from playlists
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vidcapper
post Jan 2 2020, 10:17 AM
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QUOTE(Mr. C. Joel @ Jan 2 2020, 08:57 AM) *
I actually hate CDís itís so much easier and cost effective streaming.

I would be surprised if they just stop making cdís before long.


They didn't stop making vinyl records...
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GTH
post Jan 3 2020, 12:58 PM
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QUOTE(vidcapper @ Jan 2 2020, 08:42 AM) *
Will we ever get a million-*selling* (as opposed to sales + streams) album (*) again?

(*) Artist album

Adele might be able to pull it off, but if even Ed Sheeran couldn't, who else?

BTW, I only use free streaming, and that only rarely - I prefer CD's on the occasions I do buy music.

I think Ed could with the right material. His collab album was not really catering to the audience that want more perfect/thinking out loud/a-team etc material.

Either way if albums keep declining as they have, I suspect there would be less than 10-15 this decade coming.
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ben08
post Jan 4 2020, 06:54 PM
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From Music Week
The Entertainment Retailers Association (ERA) has issued its UK consumer spending figures for 2019. And while physical music and downloads are down again, streaming is surging ahead with strong year-on-year growth in subscription services.

The headline figure is £1 billion Ė thatís how much UK consumers spent on music streaming services in 2019 (£1.002.9bn to be precise). The year-on-year increase in streaming spending was 23.5%. The performance of subscription services including Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, YouTube Music and Deezer helped total UK consumer spending on music reach £1.41bn, a year-on-year increase of 7.1%. Itís a result in line with the BPIís latest figures for 2019.

ERA has divided the music retail sector between access (ie streaming) and ownership (physical and downloads), with a split of 71.1% and 28.9%. According to the BPIís unit measurements for 2019, streaming accounts for 74.4% of consumption. Based on preliminary data compiled by ERA, the streaming spend is four times the total of five years ago. Thatís helped the music sector record its fifth successive year of growth.

ERA CEO Kim Bayley said: ďThe rise of digital entertainment services has created the biggest revolution in UK leisure habits in history, enabling people to access the music, video and games they love wherever and whenever they want, and transforming the fortunes of record labels, filmmakers and games developers. The fact that in 2019 over 80% of entertainment spending was on digital services shows the scale of that revolution.Ē

That result is contrasted by a continued decline in physical music, which is down 17% year-on-year to £318.1m. For the decade as a whole, spending on physical music is down 63.5%. The rise of vinyl continues Ė up 6.4% year-on-year to £97.1 million. While BPI unit stats have vinyl accounting for one in eight album sales in 2019, in retail value terms itís more like a third (30.8%). Last year HMV significantly expanded its vinyl offer.

The strength of vinyl in proportional sales terms is partly down to the decline in CD sales, which fell by 24.7% in retail value last year (£216.99m) Ė less than the unit decline of 26.5%, which suggests prices of deluxe editions are holding up. Cassette sales are growing but remain niche: ERAís Ďother physical albumsí spending total is £1.14m.

Downloads are the real losers from the switch in consumption. Some music consumers clearly still prefer the ownership model, though downloaders are converting to subscription streaming. Consumer spending on digital albums was down 27.5% year-on-year to £53.2m.

Despite falls in sales of physical music, video and games formats, strong demand for digital services was sufficient to produce overall entertainment market growth of 2.4% to £7.8bn, its seventh consecutive year of growth. ďThere is no doubt retailers of physical product had a tough time in 2019,Ē said Bayley. ďBut physical entertainment was still a £1.4bn retail business. Sales of vinyl and 4K Ultra HD discs are buoyant and still growing and we still have huge hit phenomena like FIFA 20 which can sell 1.5m physical units at around £40 a time. Physical is down, but itís definitely not out.Ē The yearís biggest-selling album was Lewis Capaldiís Divinely Uninspired To A Hellish Extent (EMI), which moved 641,000 units across all formats.

Bayley added: ďAs more and more people sign up to streaming services, it obviously becomes a challenge to maintain the same rate of growth, but the fact is UK music fans spent £190m more on subscription streaming services in 2019 than they did the year before Ė thatís more than twice the value of the entire vinyl market.Ē

Digital video sales grew by 21.5% to £2.11bn, while physical revenues decreased 22.7% to £500m. The biggest video hit of 2019 was the Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody with 1.7m copies sold, two thirds of them on physical formats.

Games remains entertainmentís biggest sector, but after years of growth in 2019 it shrunk by 3.4% to £3.77bn - its first year without growth since 2012. ERA blamed the decline on a slowdown in sales ahead of the expected launch in late 2020 of the new PlayStation and Xbox consoles.

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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th January 2020 - 07:37 AM