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> Madonna honored in 'best of the last 35 years' list, SPIN Magazine
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Liam.k.
post Nov 27 2020, 02:20 PM
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Top 35 Best Music Videos: https://www.spin.com/featured/the-35-best-v...-last-35-years/



1. Madonna – “Like a Prayer”
Madonna made high art out of sacrilege with her notorious “Like a Prayer” video, a molotov cocktail of melodrama, racial commentary and religious symbolism. Director Mary Lambert would release a film version of Stephen King’s Pet Sematary a month later — but for both cola brands and conservative Christians, this was the true horror project. The rapidly edited scenes — including stigmata, bleeding eyes and the spiritual laying of hands — smashed taboos with madcap zest. “I wanted to speak about ecstasy and to show the relationship between sexual and religious ecstasy,” Lambert told Rolling Stone. “I think that subconsciously a lot of people understood this and were either enthralled or outraged by it.” Maybe even both. – R.R.



20. Madonna – “Justify My Love”
The Queen of Pop once ranked “Justify My Love” the best video from her own sprawling catalog — and while we don’t completely agree (see below), it’s impossible not to consider this erotic slice of voyeurism. Within, director Jean-Baptiste Mondino wanders through the halls and bedrooms of a very accommodating hotel, documenting snippets of sexual encounters heavy on the BDSM. MTV banned the clip, which only gave the singer a publicity boost. Not that she needed it. – R.R.
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Piers
post Nov 28 2020, 12:20 AM
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Ready for an unpopular opinion that I'd only make in the anonymity of a message board with a name that isn't really mine? Lol.

It's not really one of my favorites of her videos. It's not because of its controversial nature. I just feel like it's got two distinct themes that are competing with each other. To me, everything in the church...the interaction with the statue, the choir, etc...fits perfectly with the song's theme of comparing a religious and sexual experience.

But...because that aspect works so well, the second part of the video (the man wrongfully accused) doesn't get its due. I actually think the video should be more overt in showing the wrongful accusation as racism. It's kind of there...but had they really committed to the idea, I think there'd be more weight to the burning crosses showing up. So. Basically. I think the video's kind of a hat on top of a hat. I think the sex and religion stuff works. But the wrongful accusation storyline deserved its own separate video to fully explore the theme.

Aaaaand I say all that knowing this is consistently ranked the best music video of all time, and therefore, I am likely 100% wrong. Lol. I adore the song and like about 70% of what the video does. As her controversial videos go, I actually like American Life and What It Feels Like For a Girl better as their focuses are more sharp.


This post has been edited by Piers: Nov 28 2020, 04:10 AM
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Hotlady
post Nov 28 2020, 06:23 PM
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It'such a fantastic video. But it really good I love listen to those song.
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Among Haus
post Dec 7 2020, 07:58 PM
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QUOTE(Piers @ Nov 28 2020, 12:20 AM) *
Ready for an unpopular opinion that I'd only make in the anonymity of a message board with a name that isn't really mine? Lol.

It's not really one of my favorites of her videos. It's not because of its controversial nature. I just feel like it's got two distinct themes that are competing with each other. To me, everything in the church...the interaction with the statue, the choir, etc...fits perfectly with the song's theme of comparing a religious and sexual experience.

But...because that aspect works so well, the second part of the video (the man wrongfully accused) doesn't get its due. I actually think the video should be more overt in showing the wrongful accusation as racism. It's kind of there...but had they really committed to the idea, I think there'd be more weight to the burning crosses showing up. So. Basically. I think the video's kind of a hat on top of a hat. I think the sex and religion stuff works. But the wrongful accusation storyline deserved its own separate video to fully explore the theme.

Aaaaand I say all that knowing this is consistently ranked the best music video of all time, and therefore, I am likely 100% wrong. Lol. I adore the song and like about 70% of what the video does. As her controversial videos go, I actually like American Life and What It Feels Like For a Girl better as their focuses are more sharp.

This is a really interesting take on the video ohmy.gif

For me, sorry to be predictable, but it is an outstanding visual treat. There is a real sense of dangerous controversy that builds throughout the video and things like this are very hard to replicate nowawadays without wanting to appear superficial or forced. This perfectly made a statement (or three!) in a beautifully orchestrated and crafted visual feast. It is up there as one of my favourite music videos of all time and it is great to see the recognition here.
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Liam.k.
post Dec 8 2020, 09:39 PM
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SPIN have given some more recognition for Madonna:

Top 35 Best Albums: https://www.spin.com/featured/the-35-best-a...-last-35-years/

8. Madonna – Like a Prayer (1989)
Stop what you’re doing right now and give thanks and praise to Madonna. Yeah, yeah, you might think her cross-dressing, crotch-grabbing, pointy-bra act is old hat now, but her willingness — and perhaps, desire — to shock and get banned is what made us want more. Importantly, for the landscape of women in music, she lit a blowtorch and poured taboo-based gasoline on restrictions for women in music. And she lit that baby up. Just mere months after ultra-conservative Ronald Reagan passed the Presidential Republican torch to George H. W. Bush, Madonna released her fourth album, Like a Prayer. Its first single, the title track, continued her long-standing blond ambition of pissing off the Catholic Church, its video banned by just about everyone with the short-standing power to do so. Follow-up single “Express Yourself” became an eternal anthem for women everywhere. The sweet sound of “Cherish” came after that, proving that if there’s one thing you can count on with Madonna, it’s unpredictability. Like a Prayer hit No. 1 in most countries, including the U.S. It was dedicated to Madonna’s mother, who passed when Madonna was a little girl. – L.L.

Top 35 Greatest Concerts: https://www.spin.com/featured/the-35-greate...-last-35-years/

6. Madonna’s Blond Ambition Tour (1990)
For Madonna, her 1990 Blonde Ambition Tour was more than just shock factor: It was meant to transform live pop music. With complete creative control, the pop icon supported her fourth LP, 1989’s Like a Prayer, with a dizzying production that combined sex, death, religion and cone-shaped bras. The tour was high camp and at times more theater than concert. Divided into five acts — Metropolis, Religious, Dick Tracy, Art Deco and Encore — the trek referenced everything from A Clockwork Orange to the AIDS epidemic. Of course, not everyone was pleased: The Pope and other religious groups blasted her use of religious iconography, and she was almost arrested in Toronto for breaching obscenity laws thanks to her performance of “Like a Virgin,” where she simulated masturbation onstage between two men sporting faux breasts. If anything, the drama around Blonde Ambition just elevated her fame, helping Madonna reclaim her narrative and power as the tabloids (wrongfully) deemed her a villain. By then, she’d ignited a blonde revolution. – Ilana Kaplan

The Most Influential Artists: #3 Madonna
The “Queen of Pop” isn’t enough to describe Madonna — she is Pop. Over nearly four decades, the Italian girl from Michigan formulated the blueprint of what a pop star should be: a triple-threat who’s willing to take risks and doesn’t give a damn about her critics.

Madonna’s dominance began with her eponymous debut album in 1983. But she quickly proved there was more up her lace-ruffled sleeve than bubblegum jams. Since then, she’s crafted definitive eras with a discography spanning 14 albums, over 70 music videos and numerous projects dotted in between. She became an ‘80s club kid, drifted us to “La Isla Bonita,” boldly blended sex and religion to cause a Catholic uproar, transformed into dominatrix Mistress Dita, found a ray of light through newfound motherhood and Kabbalah, brought cowboys back in style at the turn of the New Millenium, dismantled the American Dream while drinking soy lattes, became a disco queen and, in case we forgot, reminded the world that she’s an “unapologetic bitch.”

Madonna isn’t necessarily deemed a “political” artist, but she’s continuously shown advocacy for social injustices. She propelled “vogueing” from Harlem’s Black ballroom culture into mainstream success for 1990’s groundbreaking “Vogue,” unapologetically praised her faithful LGBTQ+ fanbase, flipped the male gaze on its head in countless music videos that combated a misogyny-riddled music industry and proudly withstood the constant backlash she received for her sexual expression that later gave other women the freedom to do the same.

Madonna’s fearlessness couldn’t be contained within a music box: the artist has also cemented herself as a respected actress, garnering critical acclaim for roles in 1985’s Desperately Seeking Susan, 1990’s Dick Tracy, 1992’s A League of Their Own and even won a Golden Globe for Best Actress for 1996’s Evita. She’s also a fashion icon, creating trendsetting moments with the same chameleon-like flair as her genre-bending music. Madonna has writhed around in a wedding dress for 1984’s “Like A Virgin” (which was reincarnated in a “pass the torch” moment for the lip-locking 2003 MTV VMA performance), nearly poked our eyes out with the cone bra from 1990’s now-infamous Blond Ambition World Tour, brought Hollywood’s Golden Era glamour to the 1991 Oscars, became a military sergeant for 2003’s American Life, combined matador and medieval styles for 2015’s Rebel Heart era, and channeled Marilyn Monroe any chance she got.

And of course, all of this impact has resulted in a list of accolades that unfolds longer than a CVS receipt: the highest-grossing solo artist of all time, the best-selling international female recording artist of all time, a seven-time Grammy award winner, a 20-time MTV VMA winner and a record of 38 Top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot 100.

Madonna has also birthed a legacy that a new generation of singers — from Y2K queens like Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera to millennial rule-breakers like Lady Gaga and Miley Cyrus — continue to uphold.

With the way the icon stretches her limits, it’s a wonder how the icon hasn’t had a comet named after her by now. It’ll be light-years until someone as seismic as Madonna comes crashing down from outer space again.
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