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A month at number one for 24KGoldn
Mood gets a fourth week at the top of the singles chart for 24KGoldn and Iann Dior. Rapper Headie One has the number one album.

A fourth week at number one for 24K Goldn and Iann Dior’s Mood. Headie One heads to number one in an albums chart dominated by older artists.

There is no change at the top of the singles chart as 24KGoldn and Iann Dior spend a fourth week at number one with Mood. It is only the third song this year to spend four or more consecutive weeks at the summit although The Weeknd’s Blinding Lights spent a total of eight weeks there in three separate runs.

Headie One, AJ Tracey and Stormzy climb two places to number two with Ain’t It Different, a new peak in its eighth week in the chart, all of them in the top five. Internet Money, Gunna and Don Tolliver stay at number three with Lemonade. Looking For Me by Paul Woolford and Diplo featuring Kareen Lomax climbs back up to number four. Tate McRae climbs two places to number five with You Broke Me First.

The release of Headie One’s debut album inevitably leads to tracks from it entering the singles chart. Princess Cuts (featuring Young T and Bugsey) is at number eleven and is actually OK; Parlez-Vous (featuring the all-too-ubiquitous Aitch) is at number 24 despite being terrible. Other tracks would also have made the top forty without the three-song limit imposed by the Official Charts Company.

Parlez-Vous is Aitch’s sixth top forty hit of 2020 as either the lead or featured artist. The most recent of those is a featured artist appearance on D-Block Europe’s UFO which entered the chart last week. D-Block Europe have another new entry this week with Destiny at number 34.

Dutchavelli, who entered the chart two weeks ago on Da Beatfreakz’ 808, has a hit of his own at number 29 with Cool With Me. He is joined by M1llionz, last seen in the chart with B1llionz.

This year has seen a number of songs becoming popular courtesy of videos being posted on TikTok. In general, they have been new songs which have failed to take off by more traditional means. This week we have a TikTok-inspired re-entry for a song which is over 40 years old - Fleetwood Mac’s Dreams. The song, from their mega-selling Rumours album which has been in the top forty for most of this year, reached number 24 when it was originally released. Curiously, that made it the most successful single from the album. A cover version by The Corrs (part of a multi-artist collection of covers of songs from Rumours) made the top ten in 1999). The Fleetwood Mac version is at number 37 to give the Anglo-American band their first top forty hit since 1988.

After three top forty entries in the albums chart with releases officially described as mix tapes, Headie One goes straight to the top of the pile with his first actual album, Edna (his mother’s name). Anyone who wishes to promote a stereotypical view of rappers will point to the fact that Amazon labels every one of its tracks as explicit. Other people may just label it with another word rhyming with explicit.

Just a week after Roger Waters was in the top ten with a live album called Us + Them, D-Block Europe enter at number two with the more confrontational-sounding The Blue Print - Us Vs Them. It is their fifth top forty (and fourth top ten) album in just two years.

While there is another bumper crop of new entries in the albums chart, it would be somewhat misleading to say that they represented a deluge of fresh talent. Many of them are re-entries (many linked to an 1980s-themed Albums Day last Friday) and new compilations with the occasional new album from a long-established act. They are headed by one of the most revered British songwriters in popular music history.

On 9 October 1980, significant parts of Radio 4’s Today programme were devoted to the fact that John Lennon was celebrating his 40th birthday and that his first new music for five years was due for release.. It may have seemed an odd story for a news-based programme to cover in such depth but was a reflection of the influence of Lennon and The Beatles in British culture. After all, a Beatle, a symbol of British youth in the 1960s was forty!

Just two months later, the whole of the programme was dominated by just one story. John Lennon was dead having been murdered outside his New York apartment block.

To mark what would have been John Lennon’s 80th birthday (eek!), we have a new compilation album Gimme Some Truth. The strongest material is from the early part of his solo career but, for completeness at least, it also includes songs from his final album Double Fantasy which supplemented Lennon tracks with tracks by Yoko Ono. It enters at number three, his highest albums chart position since another compilation in 1997.

Ever since The Beatles split up in 1970, there has been a string of bands described as “The New Beatles”. Before John Lennon’s murder made such a thing impossible for ever, there were regular suggestions that a new band were actually The Beatles in disguise. One such was the Canadian band Klaatu whose best-known song is Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Craft, later recorded (with the addition of The Recognised Anthem Of World Contact Day in parentheses) by The Carpenters.

On other occasions, it was a simple case of an established band releasing a song whose Beatles influences were very obvious. Those songs included Tears For Fears’ Sowing The Seeds Of Love, the first single from their third album The Seeds Of Love. Tears For Fears (essentially a duo, so only two tears rather than three) had previously been seen as a synth-pop band so this song marked a change of direction. The Seeds Of Love became the duo’s second number one album, spending a week at the top in October 1989. A super deluxe reissue enters at number thirteen.

On the subject of tears, The Tears was a short-lived project reuniting Brett Anderson with his erstwhile Suede songwriting partner Bernard Butler. The short-term nature of the project was not exactly a surprise as the tension between Anderson and Butler had led to the latter’s departure from Suede (who, as any fule kno are the best band in the history of this, or any other, universe) although the principal reason this time was his desire to concentrate on his career as a producer. That said, a new album featuring Butler as a performer (alongside Catherine Anne Davies is released today, Friday).

Those nice people at Suede HQ have decided that this is a good time for another Best Of collection and Beautiful Ones - The Best Of Suede 1992 - 2018 duly lands at number sixteen.

This new collection spans their whole career from their debut Drowners EP (all three tracks) to the three albums released after their return to action in 2010. It even includes the full-length version of one of Brett Anderson’s least favourite songs Stay Together (released just before Bernard Butler’s departure, making its title somewhat unfortunate) complete with the rather odd rap bit. Suede were always known as a band whose b-sides (when such a thing existed) were every bit as good as their singles, so it is no surprise that several of them are also included.

It is a common criticism of Best Of compilations that they are not in chronological order. This collection helps to show why that is the case. By arranging the 34 tracks (56 in the deluxe edition which has a more coherent order), they just don’t seem to flow as well as they could. Following Still Life (my own favourite Suede song) with Trash just doesn’t sound right. Nevertheless, it does illustrate how the band has developed over the years which is what some people want. It also reminds me of how the band completely blew me away when I first saw them live back in 1992 and why I still love them now,

There, that wasn’t too biased, was it?

At the time of John Lennon’s death, music fans had just two choices - vinyl or cassette. The CD was still a couple years away, downloads hadn’t been thought of and the word streaming was generally used in descriptions of the symptoms of a cold. That reliance on physical media meant that the renewed demand for Lennon’s music took a bit of time before it was reflected in the charts, apart from a surge to number one for (Just Like) Starting Over, the single which had started falling down the chart. The next single from his Double Fantasy album, Woman, went to number one and stayed there for two weeks. The song at number two that week was Ultravox’s Vienna. In other words, it is not true that Joe Dolce’s abysmal rubbish was at number one for all four of Vienna’s weeks at number two. The album of the same name eventually reached number three after a slow start. A reissue falls short of the top forty.

While the Compact Disc was launched in 1982, it took another two or three years before sales really started to take off. That coincided with the release of Dire Straits’ Brothers In Arms album. It has long been assumed that this album was one of the first to be bought by many people after they had invested in a CD player (player player) which helped to explain why the album spent a total of fourteen weeks at number one. Brothers In Arms is part of the Studio albums 1978-1991 collection which enters at number nine.

Suede’s eponymous debut album, released in 1993, was the fastest-selling debut album in the UK since Frankie Goes To Hollywood’s Welcome To The Pleasure Dome. It is still regarded as one of the best debut albums ever although, in the opinion of many, not as good as The Stone Roses’ debut released in 1989. At a time when Stock, Aitken and Waterman acts still dominated the charts, the Manchester band’s album offered something refreshingly different. Given its near-legendary status now, it seems extraordinary that it only reached number 32 on release in May and dropped straight out of the top forty. It returned to the top forty in January 1990 before climbing to the dizzy heights of number nineteen. A fifth anniversary reissue took it into the top ten for the first time and a twentieth anniversary release sent it to a new peak of number five in 2009. Yet another reissue is at number 26.

Another reissue of an eponymous debut album, from Iron Maiden, is at number twenty. It is the week’s best-selling album on vinyl.

Linkin Park are at number 25 with a reissue of their debut album Hybrid Theory together with Reanimation, an album of remixes of tracks from Hybrid Theory. Hybrid Theory missed the chart altogether when it was released in October 2000. It entered the top 100 in January the following year and eventually reached number four in November 2001. Reanimation was released the following July and reached number three.

Like Linkin Park and the Stone Roses (and Dire Straits for that matter), Travis’s career got off to a slow start. Their debut album, Good Feeling, made the top ten in 1997 but spent just one more week in the top forty. Things improved for them in 1999 when they had hits with the singles Writing To Reach You, Driftwood and the one that would go on to be their definitive song, Why Does It Always Rain On Me. They all came from their second album The Man Who. That also debuted in the top ten in May 1999 but hung around for rather longer. It eventually went to number one in August that year and eventually spent nine weeks at the top.

The Man Who proved to be the peak of Travis’s career. The follow-up, The Invisible Band, spent four weeks at number one but none of their subsequent releases topped the chart although all but one of them did reach the top ten. Their ninth studio album, 10 Songs, is at number five. Queen and Adam Lambert’s Live Around The World falls to number six after a week at the summit.

A new (allegedly Essential) UB40 collection is at number thirty. Country duo Ward Thomas are at number 29 with Invitation and American synth-pop band Future Islands enter at number 22 with As Long As You Are.
Published on: 2020-10-16 by BuzzJack.com Suedehead2 || 433 Views
Comments (4)
 
Poptarttreat
16 Oct 2020 - 17:07
BuzzJack Platinum Member
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I hate hits compilations that arent chronological, it's just so wrong!

Carpenters recorded Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Klaatu Craft (edited out accidentally), and love the typo calling Suede your fave ever bland. Just trying to show you're not biased, I know....!
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Suedehead2
16 Oct 2020 - 18:31
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Thanks for the tip-offs on the typos!
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Poptarttreat
17 Oct 2020 - 19:03
BuzzJack Platinum Member
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one minor albums tidbit I notice no-one had mentioned in Music Week is Marty Wilde hung on to enter at 75 with his new studio album, which also features Kim Wilde, in a week with a bumper 18 new entries - it's his first-ever studio album chart hit, and it's only gone and taken him 62 years to do it! Can any other act claim perseverance for that long without success?

Of course he's had charted hits compilations (though none in the 20th century) and been featured on loads of hit singles and albums (as songwriter) across the decades so kudos to him!
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Suedehead2
18 Oct 2020 - 22:28
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How very American. The English expression is titbit laugh.gif
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